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  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Brandhoek  Military cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
Person Details
Nottingham
Ernest Waldram was the son of William Arthur (k/a Arthur) Waldram and his first wife Eliza Waldram née Gibson. His father Arthur was born in 1851 in Nottingham and his mother Eliza Gibson was born in 1853 also in Nottingham. They were married in 1871 and had at least seven children who were all born in Nottingham and baptised at Nottingham St Peter: William Arthur b. 1871 bap. 28 December 1871, Albert b. 1877 bap. 8 October 1878 (Taylor Street) d. 1878 bur. Nottingham St Mary 12 October, Ernest b. 1882 bap. 14 May 1882 (9 Taylor Street), Walter b. 1885 bap. 15 November 1896 (4 Grove Street), Herbert birth registered 1888 (J/F/M) bap. 15 November 1896, Leonard b. 1891 bap. 15 November 1896 and Harold b. 1896 bap. 15 November 1896. In 1881 Arthur (30) a framework knitter and Eliza (25) a lace jennier were living at 9 Taylor Street, Nottingham, with their eldest son William Arthur (9); their second son Albert had died in 1878. By 1891 they had moved to Grove Street and Arthur was working as a stationary engine driver in a factory. Three of their four surviving sons were in the home on the night of the census; Ernest (9), Walter (5) and Herbert (3). Also in the household were three boarders: Mary Blatherwick (29 b. Bingham Notts) who was unmarried and working as a lace hand, Robert Blatherwick (6) and Mabel Blatherwick (1). The family home was still at 4 Grove Street in 1901. In the house on the night of the census were Arthur and Eliza and five of their six sons Ernest a dyer, Walter an errand lad in the lace trade, Herbert, Leonard (9) and Harold (4). Also in the household was a boarder, George Blatherwick (22 b. Oxton Notts) who was a labourer with Nottingham Corporation. Eliza died at 4 Grove Street on 1 March 1906 at the age of 53, and Arthur married Lucy Law later the same year. In 1911 Arthur and Lucy were at 4 Grove Street with Arthur's three youngest sons, Herbert a general labourer, Leonard a dyer and Harold a warehouse boy. Arthur died at 4 Grove Street on 16 December 1918. His widow Lucy died in 1923. Ernest married Clara Millichope Rice in 1901. In 1891 when Clara was 18 years old and working as a lace clipper, she had been living at 14 Abel Place, Nottingham, with her parents Harry (40), a barman, and Annie (45), a charwoman, and her sister Kate (10). By 1911 Ernest and Clara had had eight children of whom only four survived: Ernest Samuel b. 1904, Albert Arthur b. abt. 1908, Herbert birth registered 1909 (J/F/M) and Clara Waldram b. 1909. Ernest and Clara were living at 20 Brewitt's Yard, Albion Street, Nottingham, at the time of the 1911 census. Ernest was working as a dyer's labourer and Clara was a lace hand (clipping). All four surviving children were in the home on the night of the census; Ernest Samuel (6), Albert Arthur (3), Herbert (2) and Clara (1). Ernest's five brothers also served in the war; Ernest was the only casualty (see 'Extra Information').
In 1901 he was a dyer and a dyer's labourer in 1911
10 Jun 1916
34
430116 - CWGC Website
4818
Corporal
Machine Gun Corps
61st Coy Machine Gun Corps Ernest Waldram enlisted in Nottingham on 11th June 1908. He gave his age as 26 yrs and 2 months and his address as 6 Bursley Terrace, Goodhead Street, Meadows, Nottingham. He served as a reservist in the 7th battalion Sherwood Foresters but after 6 yrs and 57 days service he was discharged on 6th August 1914 as being medically unfit for military service. He rejoined the army and served initially with the Durham Light Infantry before transferring to the 61st Company Machine Gun Corps. He died of wounds on 10th June 1916 and is buried in Brandhoek Military Cemetery, Belgium (grave ref II.E.6). CWGC - History of Brandhoek Military Cemetery (extract): 'During the First World War, Brandhoek was within the area comparatively safe from shell fire which extended beyond Vlamertinghe Church. Field ambulances were posted there continuously and the Military Cemetery was opened early in May 1915 in a field adjoining the dressing station. It closed in July 1917 when the New Military Cemetery was opened nearby, to be followed by the New Military Cemetery No 3 in August 1917.' (www.cwgc.org)
Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Deaths’, 2 March 1906: ‘Waldram. On the 1st inst. At 4, Grove-street, Eliza, beloved wife of Arthur Waldram. Funeral Saturday, at 2.30, Church Cemetery’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post. 'Roll of Honour', 7 July and 15 July 1916 (abridged). 'Waldram. Killed in action June 10th, Corporal Ernest Waldram, Machine Gun Corps, 20 Brewitt’s Yard, Albion Street, aged 34. Wife and children. A report published in the Nottingham Evening Post, 4th March 1915 gives details of his family : - “SIX SOLDIER SONS. “NOTTINGHAM FAMILY’S RECORD. “No fewer than six sons of Mr. Arthur Waldram, of Grove-street, Nottingham, have responded to their country's call, and are now serving in the army. They are Lance-Corporal William Waldram [1], who served in the South African war with the Durham Light Infantry, was wounded at Pieter’s Hill, and is now in the 13th Battalion Notts. and Derbys; Private Ernest [2], who possesses the long service medal in connection with the Robin Hoods, and has re-enlisted in the Durham L.I.; Private Walter [3], member of the Royal Marine L.I., was captured at Antwerp, and is now a prisoner in Germany; Privates Herbert [4] and Harold [5], who are with the 7th Notts, and Derbys; and Private Leonard [6], in the Durham L.I.” [7] [1] Cpl., Acting Sgt., William Waldram enlisted on 5th October 1914. He saw no service overseas and was discharged, aged 46, on 27th September 1918 as no longer being physically fit for service. [2] Pte. Ernest Waldram. T.F.E.M., was discharged from the Robin Hood Rifles as no longer physically fit for service on 6th August 1914. Re-enlisting in the Durham Light Infantry, he later transferred to the Machine Gun Corps and promoted to Cpl. He died of wounds on 10th June 1916, whilst serving with the 61st Coy. M.G.C. Ernest Waldram is buried in Brandhoek Military Cemetery. [3] Pte. Walter Waldram, Portsmouth Battalion Royal Marine Light Infantry, enlisted on 26th May 1902. He was captured at Antwerp on 9th October 1914. [4] Pte., later Cpl., Herbert Waldram, 1/7th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment (Robin Hood Rifles), landed in France on 25th February 1915. He was discharged on 20th March 1916. [5] Pte. Harold Waldram, 1/7th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment (Robin Hood Rifles), landed in France on 25th February 1915 and was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve, 4th March 1919. [6] Pte. Leonard Waldram M.M., Durham Light Infantry, landed in France on 25th August 1915. He was transferred to Class Z Army Reserve after the Armistice. Above article and comments are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknal 1914-1918. Nottingham Evening Post,In Memoriam’, 8 June 1917: 'Waldram. Killed in action, June 10th, 1916. Gunner Ernest Waldram,. Not forgotten. From sorrowing father, mother, brothers (in France)’’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, 'In Memoriam’, 9 June 1917: 'Waldram. In loving remembrance of my dear husband, Ernest Waldram, killed in action June 10th 1916. Gone but not forgotten. From his sorrowing wife and children.’(www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Deaths’, 19 December 1918: ‘Waldram. On December 16th, at 4, Grove-street, Arthur, beloved husband of Lucy Waldram. At rest. Interment Church Cemetery, 1.30 Saturday' (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Brandhoek  Military cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Ernest Waldram - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Brandhoek Military cemetery, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
  • Photograph published 15th July 1917 in the Nottingham Evening Post. Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Ernest Waldram - Photograph published 15th July 1917 in the Nottingham Evening Post. Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918