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  • This photo was first published in the Retford Times on 20th Sept 1918 following the death of George Cox
Person Details
Ordsall
George was born in 1889 in Ordsall and was the son of Joseph B a railway engine driver working for the Great Northern Railway and Mary Ann Cox , he had an elder brother John , a younger brother Joseph and a younger sister Sarah. In the 1901 the family are living at Thrumpton Retford and George is 11 years of age. By 1911 the family are living at 23 Thomas Street, Retford , George is 21 years of age and single and working at the Northern rubber works as a water prooper (sic) He was married and lived at 14 Clifton Terrace, Retford with his wife Ethel and child.
He was employed for 14 years at the Northern Rubber Company.
06 Sep 1918
29
189379 - CWGC Website
241298
Acting Sergeant
22nd (Tyneside Scottish) Bn Northumberland Fusiliers
George enlisted at Retford on 29th July 1916 and served with the Royal Defence Corps with service number 74492 ,He went out to France in June 1917 . he was wounded in August 1917 and returned to England, following stays in various hospitals returned to the front in August 1918 and transferred to the 22nd battalion , Tyneside Scottish Northumberland Fusiliers . He was killed in action on 6th September 1918 and is buried in the Post Office Rifles Cemetery, Pas-De-Calais, France grave reference I E 3.
Sergt Geo. Cox Retford Times 20th Sept 1918 The mournful intelligence reached Retford on Saturday that Sergt Geo. Cox, Northumberland Fusiliers, had met his death on September 6th at the hands of a German sniper. Sergt Cox, whose wife Mrs Ethel Cox and child reside at 14 Clinton Terrace, Retford, was the second son of Mr and Mrs J B Cox of 7 Thomas Street and was held in the highest esteem by all who knew him. Employed for 14 years by the Northern Rubber Co., he enlisted on July 29th 1916 and spent his training at Strensall, Clevedon, Weston Super Mare and Wellingborough. Keen and alert, he quickly rose to the rank of Corporal. He went to France in June 1917 and in the following August near St Quentin was gassed and wounded. He was sent back to “Blighty” and spent some time in Thorpe Hospital, Norwich, after which he was transferred to Ripon, whence he returned to France on August 1st this year. Company Commander H R Lupton in describing the death which was instantaneous says:- “Sergt Cox was signalling his position when the fatal bullet caught him. He had the greatest bravery and much success bought his section to the advanced post which they were to occupy and from which they had driven the Germans.” The gallant soldier, who was 29 years of age, was a devoted member of the Primitive Methodist Church where he served as a capable secretary of the choir. News of his death cast quite a gloom over the congregation on Sunday and widespread sympathy is felt for his sorrowing relatives. A memorial service will be held on Sunday night next at the Primitive Methodist Church.
Remembered on

Photos

  • This photo was first published in the Retford Times on 20th Sept 1918 following the death of George Cox
    George Cox - This photo was first published in the Retford Times on 20th Sept 1918 following the death of George Cox
  • Buried in Post Office Rifles Cemetery.
    George Cox - Buried in Post Office Rifles Cemetery.