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  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at White House Cemetery, St Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
Person Details
Daybrook
George Armson was born at Daybrook in 1889, the son Robert a coal miner and Eliza Armson née Richards. Both his parents were born in Bedworth a village in Warwickshire, Robert was born in 1856 and Eliza in 1863, they were married in Foleshill, Warwickshire in 1879 and they had a total of nine children , however two died in infancy prior to 1911 , the surviving children were : - Hannah b1881 Bedworth, Mary b1883 Bedworth, Robert b1884 Bedworth, Ann b1886 Bedworth, Selina b1887 Hucknall George b1889 Arnold and John b1893 Arnold. It can be noted from the place of birth of the children that the family moved to Nottingham around 1887 and to Arnold around 1889. In the 1911 census the family are living at 26 Morris Street, Daybrook and are shown as Robert 55 yrs coal miner living with his wife Eliza 48 yrs and their 2 sons George 22 years single and a coal miner and John 18 years single and a coal miner. He married his wife Harriet Warsop in 1912 , it was recorded in the Basford Registration area.
His occupation was that of coal miner/hewer
20 Feb 1916
28
454321 - CWGC Website
21052
Private
2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
He enlisted in Nottingham into the Sherwood Foresters and after training was posted to the 2nd Battalion serving in France and Flanders. The 2nd Battalion relieved the 9th Suffolk Regiment in the trenches near St Jean on the 16th and the 17th and 18th were very quiet. There was a “Gas Alert” on the 19th and another on the 20th. Otherwise all was quiet. A patrol went out under Sergeant Grundy which left the trenches between 6 and 7 p.m. They made their way towards the German lines and when close enough commenced to throw bombs (grenades) into the German trench at a place where it was known that work was going on. After the explosions several groans were heard. It is believed that Private George Armson was one of the members of this patrol and when returning across No Mans Land to his own positions he was killed by a sniper. He was buried in White House Cemetery, Belgium
His brother Robert Armson also served with the Canadian Army during the Great War and died on 10th April 1917
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at White House Cemetery, St Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    George Armson - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at White House Cemetery, St Jean-Les-Ypres, Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle