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  • Photograph was published on 2nd January 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post , following him being wounded at Lille on 11th November 1914. Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Nottingham
George was the eldest son of James and Elizabeth Atkin. James and Elizabeth had six children: George b. 1889, William b. 1895 (J/A/S Nottingham), Florence (Florrie) b. 1897 (A/M/J Nottingham), Nellie (Nelly) b. 1899 (J/A/S Nottingham), Rebecca (Beccy) b. 14 July 1902 (J/A/S Nottingham) and Edith b. 1905. All the children were born in Nottingham. In 1901 James (33), a threader and winder (lace), his wife Elizabeth (35), a clipper and scalloper (lace) were living at 8 Eyre Road, Nottingham. They had four children: George (12), William (5), Florence (4) and Nelly (2). By 1911 James (44) was working as a general labourer. He and Elizabeth were now living at 5 Warren Court, Old Street, St Ann's, Nottingham, with their children George (21), William (16), Florrie (14), Nelly(11), Beccy (9) and Edith (6). Neither Nellie nor Edith were named on a form completed for the Army by their mother in 1919 listing their brother William's surviving blood relatives and it is probable that both died in 1913 as there is a record of a Nellie Atkin b. abt 1900 whose death at the age of 13 was registered in 1913 (J/F/M Nottingham, buried 3 February) and an Edith Atkin b abt. 1905 whose death at the age of 8 was also registered in 1913 (J/A/S Nottingham, buried 10 July). George married Ellen Trout in October 1914 (O/N/D Basford); their daughter, Florence Rebecca was probably born on 17 September 1914 (birth registered O/N/D Nottingham|). The family lived at 3 Kelks Yard, Arnold, Nottingham. George's brother, William, also served in the Sherwood Foresters during the war. He too had enlisted in the Special Reserve (January 1914) and was also mobilized on 5 August 1914. He was killed in action on 11 March 1915 (Le Touret Memorial). The form completed by William's mother in 1919 listing his surviving blood relatives named the following: Father & Mother: James and Elizabeth Atkin 2 Warren Court, Old Street, St Ann’s. Brothers: none. Sisters: Florence Campbell (21) 6 Wollaton Place, Woolpack Lane, Rebecca Atkin (17) 2 Warren Court, Old Street, St Ann’s. His sister Florence had married William J Cambell in 1918 (A/M/J Nottingham); he also served in France during the war. Rebecca probably married Frank Mason in 1919 (O/N/D Nottingham) and died aged 74 in 1976 (December Nottingham). George's widow, Ellen, married Alfred Parr in 1919 (A/M/J Basford); they lived at 11 Lawrence Street, Radford, Nottingham. His daughter Florence Rebecca may have married (Dawes) and died aged 73 in 1988 (June Nottingham).
He was a coal miner/pony driver
19 Sep 1918
29
2911661 - CWGC Website
4560
Private
2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
George had enlisted at Nottingham prior to the outbreak of the Great War and was a special reserve soldier. He attested on 21st April 1913 at the age of 23 yrs and 7 months. He went to France with the 2nd Battalion on 26 December, disembarking on 27 December, and was wounded near Lille on 11th November 1914. However, the previous month he had been arrested and awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 2 and was again awarded Field Punishment No. 2 and deprived of of 21 days' pay in November 1914, probably for unauthorised absence. In March 1915 he was awarded 20 days Field Punishment No. 2 for creating a disturbance and in 1916 was awarded 14 days Field Punishment No. 1 for overstaying his leave from 2am on 6 December 1915 until reporting himself at Derby on 23 January 1916. He was wounded in the scalp in August 1915 and later suffered from shell shock and admitted to hospital in the field in August 1916. In 1918 he was under close arrest awaiting trial from 10 April to 5 July 1918 for being absent without leave from 11 January 1918 to 10 April 1918; he had been apprehended on 10 April by the civilian police, probably in Nottingham. For this offence he was awarded 84 days Field Punishment No. 1 and deprivation of 59 days pay. He was with the battalion in the trenches near Monchy La Gache in September 1918. He was present on 17 September 1918, when the battalion attacked the German Line near Holnon Village, the German lines being known as 'The Green Line'. At 5.23am on the 18th they pressed forward and attacked a second German position known as The Quadrilateral. This attack continued for the whole of the day and well into the night. At 2am on 19 September 1918, the battalion received orders to withdraw to positions previously occupied. It was during this withdrawal under very heavy fire and trying conditions that George was killed in action probably by shrapnel from the very heavy enemy shell fire. He had served a total of 5 years 152 days, including time in the Special Reserve. He is buried in Chapelle British Cemetery, Holnon, France.
Memorandum dated 24th January 1916 from (-) for the Assistant Financial Secretary, War office, London SW, to officer in charge of records, Lichfield: ‘Please note that the issue of Separation Allowance to the wife of No. 4560 Private George Atkin, Notts & Derby Regiment, was stopped in consequence of a complaint made by the soldier as to his wife’s conduct. It has now been decided, however, in view of representation made as to her present satisfactory conduct, to re-issue Separation Allowance to her, for herself and child, with effect from the date of this letter. I am to request that the above information may be communicated to the soldier, through his Commanding Officer.’ (Army Service Record) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Roll of Honour’ 24 October 1918: ‘Atkin. Killed in action Sept. 17th-19th, 1918, over four years service, Pte George Atkin, aged 29, Sherwood Foresters, a second beloved son. He sleeps beside his comrades, in a hallowed grave unkown, but his name is written in words of love, in the hearts he has left at home. From his sorrowing mother, father, two sisters, Florrie and Rebecca, Will [Campbell] his brother-in-law (France).’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Letter dated 31 March 1919 from Ministry of Pensions (Widows and Dependants Branch), London, to officer in charge of records, Litchfield: Mrs Ellen Atkin was awarded a pension of 20/5d a week for self and one child with effect from 21 April 1919. George's personal belongings were returned to his widow in May 1920; they comprised a wallet, watch and strap, 2 coins, 13 photos and 2 letters.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph was published on 2nd January 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post , following him being wounded at Lille on 11th November 1914. Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    George Atkin - Photograph was published on 2nd January 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post , following him being wounded at Lille on 11th November 1914. Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918