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  • Photo shows the commonwealth war grave headstone marking the grave of Gordon Palmer, photo courtesy of Cliff Housley
Person Details
Arnold
Gordon was born at Arnold in 1885, and was the son of Thomas a coal miner and Mary Palmer née Simpson of 8 James Street, Arnold. His father Thomas was born in 1856 at Arnold and his mother Mary Simpson was born in 1854 in Kirklington, they were married on 15th May 1882 at Arnold and went on to have the following children, all of whom were born in Arnold, Eleanor b1884, Gordon b1885, William Herbert b1888, Harriett Anne b1891 and Christopher Henry b1894 . In the 1911 census he and is family are shown as living at 8 James Steet, and are shown as Thomas 55 yrs a coal miner, he is living with his wife Mary 57 yrs and their children, Gordon he is single 25 yrs of age and works as a slag breaker in a blast furnace and worked at Gedling Colliery and Christopher Henry single 17 yrs and a pony driver below ground. His brother William Herbert married his wife Annie Elizabeth Coltman on 26th October at Ripley Parish Church, they went on to have the following children, William Herbert born 29th August 1913, Ethel May born 21st January 1915 and Florence Annie born 18th May 1916, the family lived at Flying Horse Yard, Arnold.
He was employed as a slag breaker in a blast furnace at Gedling Colliery
01 Jul 1916
31
185223 - CWGC Website
14573
Private
11th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
He enlisted into the Sherwood Foresters and after training was posted to the 11th Battalion (affectionately known as “The Men From The Greenwood”) and sent to France to join them in the field. The 1st July 1916, was indeed a black day for the British Army and much has been written about it by a variety of men who were there and later historians. All along the Western Front the British attacked and the 11th Battalion who were a part of the 70th Brigade of the 8th Division were no exception. They had been held in reserve but were soon ordered forward and found it hard work to progress along the trenches which were choked with casualties all trying to get back to a Dressing Station. As the Foresters came out into the open in an attempt to relieve the men now holding the trenches to the west of Nordwerk, they met the same fate as those who had tried to go forward previously. German machine guns mowed them down like a scythe cutting grass. The German machine guns sited along the Thiepval ridge enfiladed the attack and greatly added to the casualties. It was during this attack that Gordon was cut down by German machine gun fire to become one of the 57,000 casualties of which 19,000 were killed. He was buried at Blighty Valley Cemetery,France.
His brother William Herbert Palmer enlisted on 22nd March 1915 at Nottingham, he gave his age as 27 yrs and 2 months, he gave his address as Flying Horse Yard, Arnold, and his next of kin as his wife Annie Elizabeth Palmer of the same address he gave his occupation as that of a coal miner. He was posted to the 9th battalion Sherwood Foresters and went to Gallipoli on 18th September 1915 and having survived he was transferred to the Western Front on 28th June 1916. He was transferred to the Lincolnshire Regiment on 16th July 1916. On 23rd November 1917 being no longer fit for active service was discharged from the Army. He was issued with a silver war badge number 279758.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photo shows the commonwealth war grave headstone marking the grave of Gordon Palmer, photo courtesy of Cliff Housley
    Gordon Palmer - Photo shows the commonwealth war grave headstone marking the grave of Gordon Palmer, photo courtesy of Cliff Housley