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  • Photo published in the Nottingham Evening Post dated 19th January 1915, courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Meadows, Nottingham
He was born about 1884 in the parish of St Saviour, Meadows, the son of Thomas Stretton Cox, a lace maker, and Emma Cox. In the 1911 census Thomas (57) and Emma (55), who were now living in Ruddington, were recorded as having been married for 36 years and having had four children born alive of whom only three were still living. Twenty years earlier, though, in 1891, Thomas' parents were were still living living in the Meadows, Nottingham, at 8 Preston Terrace; they had four sons: Albert (11), Thomas Arthur (7), William Bertie (5) and Harry (1). It is likely that the eldest boy, Albert, died in 1896 at the age of 16 (death registered in Apr/May/June in Nottingham registration district). Five years later in 1901 the family of five was still living at the same address in the Meadows but by 1911 only the youngest boy, Harry, was still living with his parents who by now had moved to Casthorpe Cottages in Ruddington. Thomas Arthur appears in the military census that year, serving with the 1st Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby) Regiment; the census records that in common with a number of his fellow soldiers he was absent on the night of the census most of them, like Cox, being in Wellington. It is likely that his father died in June 1921 age 67, and the CWGC record describes Thomas Arthur as the son of 'Mrs. E. Cox, of Camelot Street, Ruddington, Notts.' Emma probably died in September 1939 age 83.
In 1901 his occupation was given as a porter (school board). In the 1911 census he was listed on a military return serving with the 1st Bn Sherwood Foresters so it is likely that he became a regular soldier, particularly as he served in France from September 1914.
07 Dec 1914
31
573214 - CWGC Website
9634
He enlisted in Nottingham giving his residence as Ruddington, Nottinghamshire.
Lance Corporal
2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
It is likely that he was a regular soldier. He disembarked in France on 8 September 1914. He was killed in action and is buried in Desplanque Farm Cemetery, La Chapelle-D'Armentieres (grave ref A.16). The medal records that he qualified for the British War Medal and Victory Medal but as he served in France in 1914 he would also have been entitled to the 1914 Star.
His mother, Emma, was his sole legatee. In memoriam published 7th December 1916 in the Nottingham Evening Post ;- “COX. – In loving memory of our dear son, Corporal Arthur Cox, of Ruddington, killed at Armentieres, December 7th, 1914. Fondly remembered. – Mother and father. “COX. – In affectionate remembrance of our dear brother, Corporal Arthur Cox, killed in action, December 7th, 1914. Ever in our thoughts. – May and Bert.” In memoriam published 6th December 1919 in the Nottingham Evening Post :- “COX. – In loving memory of our dear son, Cpl. A. Cox, of Ruddington, killed December 7th, 1914. Fondly remembered. – Mother, father, and family.” All above in memoriam are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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Photos

  • Photo published in the Nottingham Evening Post dated 19th January 1915, courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Thomas Arthur Cox - Photo published in the Nottingham Evening Post dated 19th January 1915, courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918