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  • Photograph was published on 29th May 1918 in the Newark Advertiser
Person Details
Newark
Edward Hosmer Asling was born in 1889 at Newark and was the son of the late John North Asling an assurance agent and Mary Walker Asling née Padget of 70 Milner Street, Newark. His father John North was born in 1845 at North Muskham he died in 1907 at Newark aged 62 yrs and his mother Mary Walker Padget was born in 1850 at Newark, they were married in 1871 at Newark and went on to have 8 children, sadly two were to die in i9nfancy or early childhood, their surviving children all born in Newark were, Elizabeth b1873, Edwin b1876, Letitia b1880, John Fred b1883 Eleanor Waywood b1886 and Edward Hosmer b1889. In the 1911 census the family are living at 70 Milner Street, Newark and are shown as Mary Ann Asling 61 yrs a widow, she is living with her children, Eleanor Waywood 25 yrs a corset maker and Edward Hosmer 22 yrs an assistant librarian
Educated at Christ Church School before working as assistant librarian at Gilstrap Free Library.
09 May 1918
30
287980 - CWGC Website
306008
Private
2/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Private Edward Hosmer Asling enlisted at Newark in November 1914, he served with the 2/8th battalion Sherwood Foresters. He was attached to the 2/4th Battalion Royal Berkshire Regiment when he was killed in action on 9th May 1918, he is buried in Robecq Communal Cemetery. He became Col. W.C. Oates servant and served for nine months in France and returned to England with him, having suffered trench fever. Subsequently went with Col. Oates to Cromer for six months. When Col. Oates received orders to go abroad, Pte. Asling felt constrained to go with him, despite having been passed for a further three months home service.
Lieutenant Colone Coape-Oates wrote a letter to his widowed mother " Your brave boy was killed quite close to me this morning but never felt anything. A better man or more devoted friend never lived. What I shall do without him I do not know. He was always so unselfish and thoughtful, and our one consolation is, no one was more fit to go than he. He need not have come out (to the front) but his sense of duty triumphed over all, and he preferred to come. I have lost a devoted friend I can never replace. Believe me, I sympathise very deeply with you. I shall see him reverently buried tonight" Article published 29th May 1918 in the Newark Advertiser :- Youngest son of late Mr & Mrs John North Asling, 70 Milner Street, Newark. Age 29. Educated at Christ Church School before working as assistant librarian at Gilstrap Free Library. Joined 2/8th Sherwood Foresters in Nov. 1914 and went through Irish Rebellion. Shortly afterwards became Col. W.C. Oates servant. Served for nine months in France and returned to England with him, having suffered trench fever. Subsequently went with Col. Oates to Cromer for six months. When Col. Oates received orders to go abroad, Pte. Asling felt constrained to go with him, despite having been passed for a further three months home service.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph was published on 29th May 1918 in the Newark Advertiser
    Edward Hosmer Asling - Photograph was published on 29th May 1918 in the Newark Advertiser