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  • Frank Bright commemorated on the family memorial in Nottingham General Cemetery.
Person Details
11 Mar 1887
He was the youngest son of Sir Joseph Bright, a solicitor and Alderman, and the brother of Alfred Stanley, Beatrice Eveline, Horace Wickinson and Josephine Agnes Bright. His brother, Alfred Stanley, also served in the Sherwood Foresters, and was wounded and taken prisoner in March 1918. He was repatriated in September the same year. (See 'extra information') He was the nephew of Arthur and Margaret Ellis Bright who lost two sons in the war: Lieutenant Archibald Viccars Bright, 3rd Bn Sherwood Foresters (2 June 1917) and Second Lieutenant Harold Viccars Bright, 2nd Bn Sherwood Foresters (21 September 1918). He was also the nephew of Lawrence and Hannah Bright whose son, 117439 Private Joseph John Bright 7th Bn Sherwood Foresters, died of illness on 27 June 1918 in Lincoln Hospital.
Sunday School teacher at Derby Road Baptist Church. He was a mechanical engineer.
13 Oct 1915
28
52869 - CWGC Website
Second Lieutenant
1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Frank Bright was killed in front of the Hohenzollern Redoubt at Loos, the bloodiest day for the 46th North Midland Division in the war. The same day another Old Nottinghamian, R G Pyatt, serving with 1/7th Sherwoods was killed in the same fighting. He is buried in Philosphe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe (Special Memorial in front of I. A. 35. and 36.)
Personal inscription on CWGC headstone: Youngest son of Sir Joseph & Lady Bright, Nottngham. The Nottingham Guardian of Monday 25th October 1915 describes Frank Bright’s Memorial Service, held at the Derby Road Baptist chapel, in detail. The family had, apparently, worshipped there for many years. Bright himself had been a teacher in the Chapel Sunday School. A number of Nottingham notables attended the service, including J D Player and Captain S R Trotman. The congregation contained a large number of employees of John Player and Sons Ltd. In the address it was mentioned that Lieutenant Bright had come safely out of action, but left a trench to rescue a wounded comrade (his sergeant major) and was shot by a sniper as he returned. The Nottingham Daily Express on 20th October 1915 said Frank Bright was the youngest son of Sir Joseph Bright. He had been wounded in one of the recent severe engagements and granted leave. He returned to Nottingham and ‘a particularly sad circumstance associated with the report of his death on 13th is that he only reached the trenches the night before.’ On 25th October 1915 the Express under a headline of ‘Loss of Young Officer’ ‘Worthy of Victoria Cross’ related the Memorial Service. The Rev. Dr G Hill said the loss was particularly acute and asked the congregation to consider why he [Frank Bright] had given himself to this service. He ‘enjoyed the confidence and regard of so many’, but ran the risk for his country and its cause, but also ‘for the sake of certain Christian ideals and for the sake of Jesus Christ for all that is true and holy and good in human life’. He did it ‘for the sake of those things which make life worth living’. ‘He died at the call of duty ‘I shall do my duty’ he said to a friend before he went – they were the words of a true Englishman, a true Christian’. Bright was shot whilst seeking to save another: ‘He did not know whether he would be recommended for the VC but he deserved the honour’, said Rev Dr Hill. ‘Everyone who died in that manner, said the preacher, adds to the imperishable glory of our land’. Nottingham Corporation minutes of council meeting 9 November 1915: Expression of sympathy to Alderman Sir Joseph Bright on the death of his son, Lieutenant Arnold [Frank Arnold] Bright with BEF. There was a tablet to the memory of Frank Arnold Bright over the seat he occupied in the choir stalls of Derby Road Baptist Church. (Source: The History of the Derby Road Baptist Church, Nottingham. Rev SF Clark BD c1950s. CRN 0078 4960) Nottingham Evening Post, Friday 27 September 1918.’ Capt. Stanley Bright Repatriated. Capt. AS Bright, Sherwood Foresters, son of the late Sir Joseph Bright, was amongst the last batch of British officers repatriated from Germany and has arrived in Nottingham. He was taken prisoner during the great push on March 21st with a number of other local officers, and is suffering from a wound in the arm and shoulder, but is making steady progress towards recovery. Capt. Bright’s general health has not been seriously impaired and his many friends will be pleased to hear of his return to his native city.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)
Remembered on

Photos

  • Frank Bright commemorated on the family memorial in Nottingham General Cemetery.
    Photo Simon Williams - Frank Bright commemorated on the family memorial in Nottingham General Cemetery.
  • Family headstone, Nottingham General Cemetery.  Photograph Rachel Farrand
    Frank Arnold Bright - Family headstone, Nottingham General Cemetery. Photograph Rachel Farrand
  • Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking his grave at Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France. Photograph courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Frank Arnold Bright - Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking his grave at Philosophe British Cemetery, Mazingarbe, France. Photograph courtesy of Murray Biddle