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  • The Colledge family grave commemorating William Colledge in Redhill Cemetery.
photo courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Arnold
William Colledge was born in 1898 in Arnold and was the son of William (senior) a coal miner and Maria Colledge née Denison of Calverton Road, Arnold, Nottingham. His father Wiliam (senior) was born in 1865 in Arnold and his mother Maria Denison was born in 1864 also in Arnold they were married in 1883 their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration District, they went on to have 10 children, sadly one was to die in infancy, their surviving children all born in Arnold were, Mary b1884, Lily b1886, Daisy b1888, Samuel b1891, Clara b1893, Nelly b1896, William b1899, Doris b1901 and Albert b1905. In the 1911 Census he is living with his family at Calverton Road, Arnold,they are shown as William Colledge 46 yrs a coal miner, he is living with his wife Maria 47 yrs and their children, Clara 18 yrs a blouse machinist, Nellie 15 yrs a blouse machinist, William 12 yrs a scholar, Doris 10 yrs a scholar and Albert 6 yrs
He was employed as a miner at Gedling Colliery
13 Apr 1918
20
450222 - CWGC Website
267853
Lance Sergeant
1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
He enlisted at East Kirkby , in Nottinghamshire in May 1915. At 9am on the 13th April 1918, the 2/7th (Robin Hood) battalion received orders to move at once towards Neuve Eglise, to assist in clearing up a situation there. The sniping section proceeded the battalion acting as point as far as Lindenhoek. There an officer led patrol, consisting of the sniping section moved forward to find out the situation at Neuve Eglise, where they discovered the enemy had vacated that place. The patrol moved into the village and found that the situation was normal and that the enemy were being held. At 1am on the 14th April, the battalion relieved the 12th battalion of The Royal Irish Rifles and took up front line positions. “A” &”B” Coys were in the front line from Midland Farm running along the road. Troops on the right were reported to have withdrawn so that Support and Reserve Coys moved up to fill the gap. Shortly after, “B” Coy were attacked, but the enemy were easily repulsed. It was during this German attack that William was killed. He is buried at Wulverghem-Linderhoek Road Militiary Cemetery
Remembered on

Photos

  • The Colledge family grave commemorating William Colledge in Redhill Cemetery.
photo courtesy of Peter Gillings
    William Colledge - The Colledge family grave commemorating William Colledge in Redhill Cemetery. photo courtesy of Peter Gillings