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  • Remembered on his parent's headstone in Nottingham Road Cemetery, Mansfield.
Person Details
Mansfield
Edwin (Ted) John was the son of John and Sarah Ann Haynes of 5 Spencer Street, Mansfield. At the time of the 1901 census they lived at 8 Belvedere Street, Mansfield, and were shown as John Haynes, 38, head, butcher, shopkeeper; Sarah A, wife, 38; Edwin J, son, 7; Sarah A, dau, 4. In 1911 they were still living at 8 Belvedere Street, Mansfield, and shown as John Haynes, head, 47, butcher; Sarah A, wife, 47; Edwin John, son, 17, apprentice butcher; Sarah Ann, dau, 14. Army relatives form AFW. 5070 was sent to his parents on 27 June 1919. John Haynes died on 25 July 1922 aged 60 years, his daughter, Sarah Ann, on 16 January 1935 aged 36 years while his wife, Sarah Ann, died on 29 March 1939 aged 73 years.
John attended the Brunts School, Mansfield. He was an assistant butcher in 1911. According to a report in the local paper, he was employed at the Tram Depot for six years before being conscripted, and was made a tram driver when war broke out.
31 Jul 1917
23
463123 - CWGC Website
47788
He enlisted in Mansfield.
Private
1st Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
47788 Private Edwin Haynes attested under the Derby Scheme and was called up on 26 May 1916. Following initial training he had leave during which he was taken ill and spent several weeks in a military hospital at Clipstone. He continued his training and then went to France in November 1916 where he served initially in the Works Battalion unitl joining the 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters in March 1917. He was killed in action on 31 July 1917 and was buried by his comrades near the front line, '400 yards due north of Westhoek'. His body was reinterred in Tyne Cot Cemetery after the war (grave XXVII.C.8). On 31 July 1917 the third battle of Ypres began with the Battle of Pilckem. The day was overcast and ominously the unseasonable rain began. The 8th Division, of which the 1st battalion was a part, attacked at 3.50.a.m. It attacked with two Brigades plus one in support. The Worcester's and Northant's attacked first with the East Lancashires and Sherwoods passing through them to take the black line (final objective). The Sherwood's duly passed through and took the black line, coming under heavy machine gun fire from Hanebeek Valley some 700 yards distant and also Glencorse Wood, on their right flank. The battalion was pulled back to Westhoek Ridge which gave them more shelter. The enemy mounted local counter attacks but these were driven off. The battalion lost 59 men killed and Edwin was one of these.
CWGC headstone personal inscription: 'May he rest in peace' Mansfield cemetery, inscription on family gravestone: 'In loving memory of John Haynes died 25th July 1922 aged 60 years. Also Sarah Ann his beloved wife died 29th March 1939 aged 73 years. Also Private E Haynes, their son, died at Westhoek, Belgium, 1917. Also Sarah Ann their daughter died Jan. 16th 1935 aged 36 years.' Mansfield Reporter, 21 September 1917: ‘Another Brunts’ Old Boy Killed.' 'It is with the deepest regret we have to announce the death of Private Edwin J Haynes, killed in action on July 31st, He was a Brunts’ old scholar and worked at the Tram Depot for six years. At the commencement of the war he was made a tram driver. He attested in Lord Derby’s scheme and was called up on the 26th May, 1916, and sent to Leadon for his training, and then to West Hall, Whitburn. He came home on leave, and was taken ill, and was placed in a hospital at Clipstone for three weeks. He was sent back to West Hall and from there, in November, to France, and was in the Works Battalion till March, 1917, when he joined the 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters, when he met his death. The following letters have been received by the bereaved parents: ‘5th August, 1917. Dear Mrs Haynes, It is with my very deepest regret that I have to write to inform you of the death, in action, of 47788 Private E Haynes, on the 31st July. He always proved himself to be a soldier, and most useful man to his King and country. There can be no one more sorry than I am to lose such valuable men. The battalion went into action on the 31st of July, and on the advance, Pte. Haynes was hit. I trust you will accept my very deepest sympathy at your most deplorable loss. Yours truly, RF Moore, Captain. '21st August, 1917, Dear Mrs Haynes, In reply to your letter dated 15th inst., I am quite unable to grant your request to send a photo of the grave of your son, as we are not allowed to carry cameras of any description. Your son met his death at a spot 400 yards due north of Westhoek, whilst the battalion was in action. Three of his comrades buried him under the direction of his platoon officer, who was himself afterwards wounded. During the action it is quite impossible to move them to the cemetery behind the line, as we have numbers of wounded to carry, but I can assure you that everything possible under the circumstances was done at the time. I fully appreciate your very sad loss, and can fully sympathise with you, as I have myself lost many of my best friends, besides the friends I have had in this battalion. I shall be only too pleased if I can give you any further information at some future time. I remain, yours very truly, RF Moore, Captain.’ 'A photograph of the deceased soldier will appear in our columns next week.’ (www/britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Captain RF Moore: probably Robert Frank Moore, Lt. Col. 1st Bn Sherwood Foresters, killed 30 May 1918 aged 28 (Soissons Memorial). His brother, Sgt Hubert Wilfred Moore, London Regiment, was killed on 1 September 1918 aged 27 (Peronne Road Cemetery). Mansfield Reporter, ‘Roll of Honour’, 21 September 1917: ‘Haynes. In loving memory of our dear grandson, Private Edwin John Haynes (Ted), killed in action July 31st, 1917, in his 23rd year. ‘A day of remembrance sad to recall.’ From his loving Grandmother and Granddad.’ (www/britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk)Mansfield Reporter, ‘Roll of Honour’, 21 September 1917: ‘Haynes. In loving memory of Private Edwin John Haynes (Ted), Sherwood Foresters, the dearly beloved son of Mr and Mrs J Haynes, late of 8, Belvedere-street, killed in action July 31st, 1917, in his 23rd year. ‘He left his home one night, Intending to come back, But sad the news that came to us, Which we shall not forget. Duty called him; he was there To do his bit, and take his share, His heart was good, his spirit brave, Loving thoughts will always wander To one place -where he is laid.’ From his sorrowing Mother, Father, and Sister, Aunts and Uncles.’ (www/britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Mansfield Reporter, 28 September 1917, photograph with caption: ‘Killed in action. Pte Edwin J Haynes, Mansfield. Private EJ Haynes, a Brunts old scholar, was killed in action on July 31st, in France. He was attached to the Sherwood Foresters. Details of his career were given in our columns last week.’ (www/britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Registers of Soldiers Effects: his mother was his sole legatee and received payments: 30/11/1917 - £4- 5s-2d and 6/11/1919 -£4-10s-0d gratuity.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Remembered on his parent's headstone in Nottingham Road Cemetery, Mansfield.
    Edwin Haynes - Remembered on his parent's headstone in Nottingham Road Cemetery, Mansfield.
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave in Tyne Cot Cemetery, Belgium.  Photograph courtesy of Murray Biddle.
    Edwin John Haynes - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave in Tyne Cot Cemetery, Belgium. Photograph courtesy of Murray Biddle.
  • Photograph published in the Mansfield Reporter, 28 September 1917.
    Edwin John Haynes - Photograph published in the Mansfield Reporter, 28 September 1917.