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  • Photograph originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the 'Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918' held in Worksop Library.
Person Details
Worksop Nottinghamshire
Charles Caudwell was the fourth son of six children born to George and Sarah Hannah Caudwell (nee Swannack). His father George Caudwell was born in Coddington, near Newark, in about 1844. In 1871 George was working as a wood sawyer and living in Worksop. His mother Sarah Hannah was born in North Carlton on 19 July 1852, the daughter of John and Sarah Swannack. In 1861 she was living with her family in North Carlton but by 1871, aged 18, she was a domestic servant living and working in Worksop. George and Sarah were married at St John the Evangelist, Carlton in Lindrick, on 24 July 1873 (J/A/S Worksop). They had six children all of whom were baptised at the priory church of SS Mary and Cuthbert, Worksop; Wiliam Swannack birth registered 1878 (J/F/M) bap. 17 March 1878; Fred b. 1882 bap. 31 December 1882; George Albert b. 1885 bap. 25 April 1886; Charles b. 1887 bap. 1 April 1888; Florrie otherwise Florence b. 12 March 1891 bap. 2 June 1891 and Louisa b. 8 March 1893 bap. 2 July 1893. In 1881 George (37) and Sarah (28) were living at 2 South View Cottes, Cheapside, Worksop, with their son William (3). Although most of the records gave the children's places of birth as Worksop it is likely that Florrie was born in Hardwick and Louise in Clumber. One of the military records gave Charles' place of birth as Clumber although when he was baptised in April 1888 the family was living on Calin Hill, Worksop, where they had probably lived for at least six years. George and Sarah lived in Worksop for a number of years, their address on the baptismal registers from 1882 to 1887 being Calin Hill, Worksop, but by 1891 they were living in Hardwick. George was a woodman and probably working on the Hardwick estate which was owned by the Devonshire family (descendants of 'Bess of Hardwick', Countess of Shrewsbury). George and Sarah were stil living in Hardwick in 1901; he was now a foreman in a timber yard. Five of their six children were still living at home: Fred (18) a carpenter's apprentice, George (15) a joiner's apprentice, Charles (13) a gardener's apprentice, and Florrie and Louisa who were still at school. Alo in the household was a boarder, George Jenner (34 b. Hayes Middx) who was a stud groom. The eldest son William has not yet been traced on the 1901 Census. George had retired by 1911 and he and Sarah were back in Worksop, living at 49 Central Avenue. Only George a joiner, Charles a coal miners' trammer below ground and Louisa (no occupation), were still living at home. William and Florrie have not yet been traced on the 1911 Census. However, Fred had married Fanny Swannack in 1907 (J/F/M Kendal Westmoreland) and in 1911 they were living at 35 Allen Street, Worksop, with their daughter Phyllis (b. 1910, J/A/S East Retford). Fred was a colliery carpenter below ground. According to the census they had had two children, both living, but their son Charles Frederick (b. 1907 O/N/D Worksop; Swannack) has not yet been traced. Fred was employed as a colliery carpenter below ground. His wife Fanny was his cousin, the daughter of his mother's brother, Charles Swannack, who in 1891 was living in Westmoreland with his wife and children including Fanny (5 b. Carlton in Lindrick); Charles was a domestic coachman. Charles' father George probably died in 1922 (J/F/M Worksop). His mother Sarah Hannah was living with her married daughter, Florence Hague, in East Retford in 1939 when the England & Wales Register was compiled. Sarah died the following year (1940, J/F/M East Retford). Of Charles' siblings: William Swannack has not yet been traced after 1891. Fred married Fanny Swannack in 1907. Fanny may have died in 1913 (A/M/J Sheffield) and there is a record of a Fred Caudwell marrying Edith Pagett in 1913 (O/N/D Worksop). However, in 1939 a Fred Caudwell (b. 2 July 1882, occupation joiner) was registered living on Stanley Street, Gainsborough, with his wife Sarah Ann (b. 3 October 1876) and there is a record of a marriage of Fred Caudwell to Sarah A Hawkings in 1938 (O/N/D Gainsborough. There is a probate record for Fred Caudwell of Stanley Street, Gainsborough, died 11 November 1946; administration awarded to his widow Sarah Ann. George Albert married Clara Dean at the priory church Worksop on 29 June 1912; they had two children: Florence May b. 27 November 1912 and George Albert b. 14 March 1915. They were living at 112 Netherton Road, Worksop, when George attested on 10 December 1915. He was posted to the Northumberland Fusiliers and transferred to the Army Reserve the following day. He was mobilised on 4 November 1916 but to the Royal Engineers as a sapper since he was a 'carpenter and joiner skilled' but transfered to Class 'W' Army Reserve on 18 November 1916. Mobilized on 13 February 1917 as a sapper (212885) he was posted to No. 3 Depot Co. RE. On 9 September 1917 he embarked at Folkestone disembarking at Boulogne the same day only to be transferred from the Royal Engineers into the 14th Northumberland Fusiliers on 13 September. Two weeks later on 26 September he was wounded 'at duty'. His army service record then shows that on 6 January 1918 he was transferred back into the Royal Engineers which needed his specialist skills, and was posted to its Base Depot. Authorised leave in the UK from 17-31 October 1918 he then remained in France with Royal Engineers until 29 January wen he returned to the UK for demobilization in February 1919. He was discharged to 91 Netherton Road, Worksop. George died in 1937 (J/F/M Worksop). He was survived by Clara who was stillliving at 91 Netherton Road in 1939; she probably died in 1967. Florrie otherwise Florence married Philip G Hague (b. 9 September 1898) in 1924 (J/F/M Worksop). In 1939 they were living in East Retford; Philip was an threshing machine engine driver. Florence's mother Sarah was living with them. Philip died in 1975 and Florence on 16 March 1978; she was still living in Retford. Louisa married Jack Hardwick (b. 5 July 1891) in 1917 (O/N/D Worksop). In 1939 they were living on Cemetery Road, Worksop; Jack was a bulk wood turner. Louisa died in 1992 (O/N/D Worksop).
In 1901 he was a gardener's apprentice but by 1911 working as a coal miner trammer (underground) at Manton Colliery.
09 Aug 1915
27
696980 - CWGC Website
13061
Enlisted Worksop
Private
6th Bn Lincolnshire Regiment
6th Bn Lincolnshire Regiment. Charles served in the Gallipoli campaign and was killed in action on 9 August 1915; one of the records gives his date of death as 'on or about 9 August 1915, death presumed'. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial (Panel 45 to 47), one of 20095 casualties named on this memorial. CWGC Helles Memorial: 'The eight month campaign in Gallipoli was fought by Commonwealth and French forces in an attempt to force Turkey out of the war, to relieve the deadlock of the Western Front in France and Belgium, and to open a supply route to Russia through the Dardanelles and the Black Sea. The Allies landed on the peninsula on 25-26 April 1915; the 29th Division at Cape Helles in the south and the Australian and New Zealand Corps north of Gaba Tepe on the west coast, an area soon known as Anzac. On 6 August, further landings were made at Suvla, just north of Anzac, and the climax of the campaign came in early August when simultaneous assaults were launched on all three fronts. However, the difficult terrain and stiff Turkish resistance soon led to the stalemate of trench warfare. From the end of August, no further serious action was fought and the lines remained unchanged. The peninsula was successfully evacuated in December and early January 1916.' (www.cwgc.org/visit-us/find-cemeteries-memorials)
Registers of Soldiers' Effects: his father George Caudwell was his legatee.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the 'Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918' held in Worksop Library.
    Charles Caudwell - Photograph originally published in the Worksop Guardian and now in the 'Borough of Worksop Roll of Honour of the Great War 1914-1918' held in Worksop Library.
  • CWGC 76100: 'The Helles Memorial stands on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. It takes the form of an obelisk over 30 metres high that can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles.'  (www.cwgc.org/visit-us/find-cemeteries-memorials)
    Charles Caudwell - CWGC 76100: 'The Helles Memorial stands on the tip of the Gallipoli Peninsula. It takes the form of an obelisk over 30 metres high that can be seen by ships passing through the Dardanelles.' (www.cwgc.org/visit-us/find-cemeteries-memorials)