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  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave of Frederick Maden Eberlin in the Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. 
Photograph courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
16 Jan 1897
Frederick Harold Maden was the younger son of Albert and Annie Charlotte Eberlin (née Maden). His father Albert was born in Sheffield on 3 March 1863, the son of Frederick Eberlin (b. Wurtemburg Germany, naturalised British citizen) and his wife Sarah. In 1881 Albert was a pharmacuetical apprentice living in Sheffield in the household of William Botham, a pharmaceutical chemist. By 1891 Albert was a qualified chemist and living in Nottingham. His mother Annie Charlotte was born in Macclesfield on 19 October 1860, the daughter of the Reverend James Maden, a Baptist Minister, and his wife H. Ellen. Annie was a private governess and had connections with Nottingham as in 1881 she was recorded on the census as a visitor in the home of Joseph Peck, a hosiery manufacturer, and his wife Ellen on Market Street, Nottingham. Albert and Annie were married in 1893 (O/N/D Basford) and had two sons Albert Edgar b. 18 March 1895 and Frederick Harold Medan b. 16 January 1897, who were both born in Nottingham. In 1901 Albert, a chemist and optician, and Annie were living at 5 St James Terrace, Nottingham, with their sons Albert (6) and Frederick (4). Also in the household was a cook and a housemaid. By 1911 the family had moved to 16 Park Terrace, The Park, Nottingham; Albert still employed a cook and housemaid. The eldest son, Albert, was away at boarding school in Mill Hill, Hendon, London. Albert and Annie were still living at 16 Park Terrace when the England & Wales Register was compiled in 1939. Albert, a retired chemist, was listed as a company director [Messrs Waterall & Eberlin, chemists]. He and his wife continued to live at the same address until their deaths, Albert on 26 December 1940 and Annie Charlotte on 18 December 1950. Frederick's brother Albert Edgar, a chartered architect, also served in the 3rd King’s Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, attached Machine Gun Corps. He was awarded the Military Cross for continued command of his company while under attack on 25 April 1918, although suffering gunshot wounds to both legs. Albert married Edith A Daft (b. 15 December 1896, d. 1965) in 1924 and they had two sons; Richard Harold (b. 1926, d. 16 July 1994) and Edgar Anthony b. 1929). Albert Edgar became a Fellow of RIBA and designed numerous buildings in Nottingham and its suburbs. He died in Nottingham on 13 January 1977.
He attended the Nottingham High School; he was admitted on 14th January 1908 aged 10 and left in 1911.
25 Jul 1917
20
2750270 - CWGC Website
Second Lieutenant
Royal Flying Corps
3rd Bn. King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry later of the Royal Flying Corps. Frederick was awarded the Royal Aero Club Aviators' Certificate, L&P Biplane, at the London & Provincial School, Hendon, on 8 December 1916. Frederick served in France but was killed accidentally during an exhibition flight in a Sopwith Pup before Field Marshall Viscount French at Hornchurch, England, on 25th July 1917. He was buried with full military honours in Nottingham Church (Rock) Cemetery on 28 July following a service at Mansfield Road Baptist Church.
Buried: Nottingham Church (Rock) Cemetery, Central Section, grave 9650 (15 rows along, 10 graves in). Inscription on the grave reads: “He flew to save us all. killed flying a Sopwith Pup. Served in France. Credited with four enemy aircraft.” Mansfield Road Baptist Church: A brass lectern was given to the church in his memory by his parents and brother. Report published in the Nottingham Evening Post, 7th June 1915: “MOTOR ACCIDENT NEAR BRIDLINGTON. YOUNG LIEUTENANT KILLED. TWO NOTTINGHAM OFFICERS’ BROKEN LIMBS. “A serious motor smash occurred last night [6th June 1915] near Bridlington. Four officers belonging to the King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry, Lieut. Augustus Hethersett Hemsworth, Lieut. Stokes, Lieut. Edgar Eberlin, and Lieut. Harold Eberlin, had been spending a few hours in Bridlington. Hemsworth and Stokes were riding on separate motor cycles, but the brothers Eberlin were on one motor cycle. Passing through the village of Bessingly all were asked by the military patrol to reduce their lights. “They extinguished them, and the brothers Eberlin rode off first, but three miles away they collided with a motor car driven by Mr. George Baxter, a butcher, of Bridlington, who was accompanied by his brother-in-law, Mr. Beeforth, of Harrogate. They were badly injured, each sustaining a fractured leg. Mr. Baxter was attending the injured men when Lieut. Stokes rode up. “Mr. Baxter proceeded to Bridlington to fetch the doctor, but had not gone far, and was approaching Carnaby village when Lieut. Hemsworth’s motor cycle collided with the car. The young officer was pitched through the wind screen and killed instantly. “The body was conveyed to Bridlington by Mr. J. Major Wilson in a motor car, and the injured officers were taken to Lloyd Hospital, Bridlington. “The two Eberlins are the sons of Mr. A. Eberlin, of Park-terrace. Nottingham. Mrs. Eberlin left for Bridlington this morning to see her injured sons.” Nottingham Evening Post, 'Roll of Honour', 26 July 1917: 'Eberlin. On July 25, Second Lieutenant FHM Eberlin (Harold) 3rd Res. KOYLI attached to RFC accidentally killed, younger son of A Eberlin Esq JP and Mrs Eberlin of Park Terrace.' Nottingham Corporation minutes of council meeting 16 August 1917 (also minutes 30 July 1917): 'Expression of sympathy to Mr A Eberlin JP and ... on the deaths of their sons whilst serving with the Colours.' Report published in the ‘Nottingham Evening Post,’ 28th July 1917:- “Among many expressions of sympathy which the parents have received is one from Field Marshal Viscount French, in which he says, “I was present and witnessed your son’s sad accident yesterday. He was a most gallant and promising young officer, and is a great loss to the army. Please accept my heartfelt sympathy.” Report published 28th July 1917 in the Nottingham Evening Post :- “THE LATE LIEUT. EBERLIN “A MOST GALLANT AND PROMISING OFFICER. “The remains of the late Lieut. F. H .M. Eberlin (K.O.Y.L.I., attached to the R.F.C.), younger son of Mr. A. Eberlin. of Park-terrace, Nottingham, who was accidentally killed while on duty, were laid to rest in the Church Cemetery, Nottingham, to-day [28th July 1917], in the presence of a large number of mourners and friends. The final rites were preceded by a memorial service at the Mansfieid-road Baptist Church, and here, too, there was a large congregation. A firing party, band, and escort of military accompanied the gun carriage upon which reposed the coffin, and the bearers were members of the Royal Flying Corps. A number of officers represented the same corps. “The service at the church was conducted the Rev. G. M. Elwee, who delivered a brief but eloquent address, and the hymns were “O Blessed life, the heart at rest,” “O God of Love, O King of Peace.” and ‘‘For ever with the Lord.” The organist (Mr. F. B. Herbert) played Gounod’s ‘‘Ave Maria” before the service, and Handel's “Largo” at the close, and at the graveside the committal prayers were read by the Rev. A. W. Dewick, rector of St. Peter’s. “In addition to the family mourners there were present Mr. E. Harlow, Mr. W. B. Starr, Mr. H. Hill, Mr. R. Granger, Mr. R. Sands, Mr. F. E. Rushworth. Mr. F. Jackson, Mr. E. Hickling, Mr. W. Goodliffe, Mr. H. E. E. Turton, Mr. C. H. Williams, Mr. F. Ross Sergeant, Mr. W. Gath, Mr. A. J. Savage, and Mr. G. C. Stretton. There were many beautiful floral tributes. “Among many expressions of sympathy which the parents have received is one from Field Marshal Viscount French, in which he says, “I was present and witnessed your son's sad accident yesterday. He was most gallant and promising young officer, and is a great loss to the army. Please accept my heartfelt sympathy.” Above reports are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918 Probate: Eberlin Frederick Harold Maden of 16 Park-terrace Nottingham second-lieutenant in HM Army died 25 July 1917 at Hornchurch Essex Administration 5 July to Albert Eberlin chemist. Effects £228 18s. 9d. Nottingham Evening Post, 27 December 1940: ‘Mr A Eberlin Dead. Mr Albert Aberlin (sic), senior partner in the firm of Messrs Waterall and Eberlin, chemists, Chapel-bar, Nottingham, died last night at his home, 16 Park-crescent, at the age of 77.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Deaths’, 27 December 1940: ‘Eberlin. Albert JP, December 26th, at 16 Park-terrace, aged 77. Cremation private [Wilford Hill]. Memorial service High Pavement Chapel, 12.0 midday, Monday, December 30th. No mourning, no flowers, but small gifts to Nottingham Eye Infirmary, The Ropewalk.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk). The Nottingham Evening Post of 30 December 1940 had a report of the memorial service.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave of Frederick Maden Eberlin in the Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. 
Photograph courtesy of Peter Gillings
    Frederick Harold Maden Eberlin - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave of Frederick Maden Eberlin in the Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. Photograph courtesy of Peter Gillings
  • Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Frederick Harold Maden Emberlin - Courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918