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  • Photograph showing the war memorial at Creswell Village, Derbyshire upon which Victor Enoch Clarkes name is commemorated, photo is courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire
Son of Enoch and Merab Clarke of 24, Morven Street, Creswell, Derbys. The 1901 Census shows the family living at 81, Albert Street, Hucknall, by the 1911 census the family were living at 48 Morven Street Creswell. His brother Thomas Edward Clarke was also killed in action.
1911 census shows him employed as a coal miner driver
09 Aug 1916
24
744700 - CWGC Website
19800
Cresswell Derbyshire
Private
9th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Private Vincent Enoch Clarke, enlisted at Worksop whilst living at Creswell. He initialled served with service number 11528 in the Leicestershire Regiment , later transferring to the 9th Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire) Regiment, attached 8th Battalion South Staffordshire Regiment, he was killed in action on 9th August 1916. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, France. Victor was one of five men to die on 9th August, despite the battalion war diaries saying it was a 'quiet' period. Aerial activity by the enemy was a problem and this aerial spotting brought down artillery on the battalion particularly near HQ. The period from 9 a.m. on 8th until 10 a.m. on 9th, also saw a continuous gas alert,
An article published in the Derbyshire Courier dated 26th August 1916 :- “Mr and Mrs Enoch Clarke, Morven-street, Creswell, have received intimation that their son, Private Vincent Clarke, South Staffordshire Regiment, was killed on 9 August. He was on patrol duty, and was struck with a shell, which killed him instantaneously. News of his death was conveyed by Lance-Corporal S. Gascoyne, who wrote: –– “Dear Mr and Mrs Clarke, –– It is with the deepest regret I have to inform you of poor Vincent’s death, for he, with several others, was struck down at 4.30 a.m. on 9 August, death being instantaneous. He never murmured after he was struck. Believe me, he died a soldier doing his best for honour of his King and country. He never grumbled, and was always amiable and willing. He was a great favourite of mine, as he was in my section all the time in the Eastern Counties, and was well liked by every one of us. I saw him buried and I put a small cross on his grave. Rest assured he never knew any pain. With deepest sympathy in your sad bereavement, in which all Vincent’s comrades join.” “Second-Lieut. F. Kits also wrote: “I was in the same portion of line as your son, and although I did not know him I can sympathise with you in your trouble. All our lads did their work well.” “His brother enlisted in August, 1914, and was drafted to France in January, 1915. He was wounded in the following April, and remained in hospital until September, when he went to Egypt, removing thence to France about a month before he laid down his life. Before enlisting he worked at Creswell Colliery, and, like his hero brother, was very popular amongst his work-mates and villagers generally.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great Hucknall 1914-1918. One of his brothers was killed but the details did not fit with those given here. Pte. Thomas Edward Clarke, also born in Hucknall, was killed in action on 19th June 1915 while serving with 1st Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment. He is buried in Neuve-Chapelle British Cemetery.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph showing the war memorial at Creswell Village, Derbyshire upon which Victor Enoch Clarkes name is commemorated, photo is courtesy of Peter Gillings
    Victor Enoch Clarke - Photograph showing the war memorial at Creswell Village, Derbyshire upon which Victor Enoch Clarkes name is commemorated, photo is courtesy of Peter Gillings