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Person Details
North Collingham, Nottinghamshire
Born Fourth Quarter 1898 in Collingham He was the son of Michael Herbert and Minnie Jane Colton On 1901 Census he is living with his parents and siblings - Michael Herbert Edmonds and Dorothy Edmonds – at Brooklands, Collingham. His father is listed as a solicitor. Attended The Magnus Grammar School, Newark upon Trent On 1911 Census he is living with his parents and siblings - Michael Herbert Edmonds, Dorothy Edmonds, and Harold Edmonds – at 71 Harcourt Street, Newark. His father is not shown on the Census, but was still alive as he didn’t die until 20th Dec 1914 Michael and Minnie later moved to South Scarle Hall Newark.
28 Mar 1918
19
745200 - CWGC Website
On 1911 Census he is living at 71 Harcourt Street, Newark
Second Lieutenant
  • MC MC Military Cross
1st Bn Northumberland Fusiliers
Entered Sandhurst in August 1916, Posted to the Northumberland Fusiliers in May 1917. Arrived in France on 30th November 1917, he won his Military Cross at Bullecourt, he was shot by a sniper and killed on 28th March 1918. Gazette Number 30801, p8455 16th July 1918, Military Cross: with reference to the awards conferred as announced in the London Gazette dated 18th February, 1918, the following are the statement of service for which the decoration was conferred "For conspicuous gallantry and devotion to duty. During hostile attacks he succeeded in taking a bombing patrol along the whole of the support trench occupied by the enemy and later conducted bomb parties against the enemy blocks, engaging them with vigour and determination. On the following day he succeeded in clearing a trench for a distance of 400 yards, and in establishing a strong bombing post. His courage and leadership were of the highest order. " His brother, 1715 Private Michael Herbert Edmonds Colton, 1st / 1st Nottinghamshire Yeomanry, was killed in action 22nd August 1915 aged 21 and is commemorated on the Helles Memorial Panel 16
The Magnus School in the Great War: Monday 8 April 1918: Widow Minnie Jane Colton at South Scarle Hall, and formerly of 10 Harcourt Street, Newark, discovered a second son had been killed in action. She was assured that Second Lieutenant Stanley Edmond Colton, only 19 and already the proud owner of the Military Cross, died a hero; but that was scant consolation to a lady who lost her other son, stretcher-bearer Michael Herbert Edmond (Bert) of the Sherwood Rangers, in the great charge by the Yeomanry on the Gallipoli Peninsula. Stanley was a Magnus Old Boy of fine physique; a good athlete who played in the cricket XI and rugger XV. He went to Sandhurst in August 1916, was granted a commission as soon as he was old enough and posted to the Northumberland Fusiliers in May 1917. From his arrival in France on 30 November 1917, his prowess as an athlete stood him in good stead as bombing officer; and he won the MC within weeks. His award, announced in the London Gazette as recently as 18 February 1918 (page 2159), revealed that at Bullecourt during hostile attacks he succeeded in taking a bombing patrol along the whole of the support trench occupied by the enemy. Later he conducted bombing parties against the enemy blocks. On the following day cleared a trench for a distance of 400 yards. Reporting Stanley’s death, his Commanding Officer, Colonel D F de C Buckle, wrote to Mrs Colton: ‘Please accept my sincerest sympathy in your great loss. Ever since your son joined the Battalion, he has shown himself a thorough soldier and a most capable leader. The bombing attack at Bullecourt, which won him the Military Cross, was a fine feat. On the 28th, the day on which he was killed by a sniper, he did splendidly and was the leader in a bombing enterprise which drove off the Germans at a very critical moment. In his death the Regiment has lost a fine officer who, I am sure, would have risen rapidly. He will be greatly missed by all.’ He is remembered on the Arras Memorial Bay 2 and 3
Remembered on

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  • Arras Memorial -