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Person Details
Huthwaite Nottinghamshire
Ernest was born in 1892 in Huthwaite and was the son of John George and Mary Ellen Bower (nee Bedford). John George died in 1894 when Ernest was only 2 years old. In the 1901 census Ernest (8) was living with his maternal grandparents' home at New Fall Street, Huthwaite. His grandfather John Bedford (56) was a pork butcher. Also in the home were Ernest's grandmother Annie (53) and his widowed mother Mary (31), a dressmaker. Ernest's mother married Sam Buxton in 1905 and by the 1911 census the family was living at 94 Mason Street, Sutton in Ashfield: Sam (40), a grocer, Mary Ellen, their son John William Buxton (5) and Mary's son Ernest, now 18 years old, and working as a pork butcher's assistant' presumably with his grandfather, John Bedford. Ernest married Lillian Oldham in Mansfield in 1916.
Pork butcher's assistant.
03 Jun 1917
25
105032 - CWGC Website
46790
Lance Corporal
11th Bn Northumberland Fusiliers
Ernest enlisted in Sutton in Ashfield and served with service number 37663 in the North Staffordshire Regiment. He later transferred to the 11th battalion Northumberland Fusiliers and was promoted lance corporal. Ernest was killed in action on 3 June, 1917. He is buried in Costtaverne Wood Cemetery, Belgium (grave reference VI.D.7).
Notts. Free Press 15th. June, 1917 Huthwaite Soldier Killed Lance-corporal E. Bower News was received on the 7th. inst. of the death in action of Lance-Corporal E. Bower (North Staffs Regiment). The intimation was conveyed to his wife by a letter from Second Lieutenant R. H. Penny, who stated that Lance - Corporal Bower was killed instantaneously on the previous Sunday while in action with a machine-gun section. The deceased soldier was 24 years of age and had been married 15 months. He was in business in New Fall Street, and was brought up by his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Bedford. His death occurred just a year after his joining up. He had been some time in France, and Second Lieutenant Penny’s letter assured his wife of the sympathy of himself and the whole platoon. Lance-Corporal Bower was well-known in the town, and his death has been a great blow to his aged grandparents. Mansfield Reporter, 29 June 1917: ‘Huthwaite Memorial Service. Five Local Heroes Honoured. At the Parish Church on Sunday morning a beautiful and impressive memorial service was conducted to the memory of five local men who have made the supreme sacrifice. Their names are: Lance-Corporals E Hower [Bower], (N/Staffs), A Weston (KRR), and Ptes Geo. Stubbins (Sherwood Foresters), H. Burton and T Phillips (both of the Canadian Contingents). Particulars of their lives have separately appeared in these columns during the last few weeks. At the service, which was conducted by the Rev. FN Beswick, every possible mark of affection and respect was shown to the memory of the departed heroes … The Union Jack was at half mast on the church tower throughout the day. There was a numerous gathering of mourners, but the general public was poorly represented, a downpour of rain probably militating against a large congregation. As the choir proceeded to their places, the organist, Mr JP Morley, played a brief funeral voluntary improvised by himself and the two special Psalms were the 39th and the 130th, and appropriate lessons. Stainer’s familiar anthem, ‘What are these arrayed in white robe?’ was chosen … The two hymns were ‘Lord as to Thy dear Cross we flee’ and ‘For all the Saints who from their labours rest.’ The text was ‘I know that my Redeemer liveth’ and the rev. gentleman delivered a touching, but compelling sermon, remarking that the words were especially appropriate at this time … The names of all from the parish who have fallen in the war were read out, and the service ended with the Dead March from Saul, and Beethoven’s Funeral March.; (www.britishnewspaperarcive.co.uk) 'In memoriam' notice, published 3rd June 1918 in the Nottingham Evening Post :- “BOWER. – In loving memory of my dear son, Lance-Cpl. Ernest Bower, Huthwaite, killed in action June 3rd, 1917. When alone in sorrow bitter tears flow, there stealeth a dream of sweet long ago, unknown to the world he stands by my side, and whispers, dear mother, death cannot divide. – From his loving mother, brother Jack, and step-father.” Above notice courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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