[Skip to content]



Person Details
21 Aug 1890
Nottingham
Frederick Henry was the only son of Thomas Henry and Annie Harper (née Kirk). Both his parents were born in Nottingham, Thomas Henry in 1865 and Annie in about 1862. They were married in 1888 and had four children who were born in Nottingham: Edith Elizabeth Ann b. 1889, Frederick Henry b. 21 August 1890, Mary Ethel b. 1895 and Madeleine Lilian (also Lilian Madeleine) b. 1899. In 1891 Thomas, a builder's foreman, and Annie were living on Robin Hood Chase, Nottingham, with their two children Edith (2) and Frederick (7 months). Although Thomas was listed as head of household they may have been living at 118 Robin Hood Chase with Annie's parents, George, a draper, who was also listed as head of household, and Mary Kirk and her brother George (20) a draper's assistant. By 1901 the family had moved to Gedling Road, Carlton, Nottingham. In the home on the night of the census were Thomas, a building contractor, his wife and four children Edith, Frederick, Mary (6) and Madeleine (1) as well as Annie's widowed father, George Kirk, a woollen draper and smallwear dealer, and Thomas's widowed mother Ann Harper (54) who was living on her own means. Also in the household was a general domestic servant. Thomas and Annie were still at the same address in 1911. Also in the home on the night of the census were their three daughters, George Kirk and a domestic servant. Frederick, a clerk of works in the building trade and possibly working for his father, was a boarder in an apartment and boarding house on Drummond Road, Skegness, Lincolnshire. Frederick's parents were still living on Gedling Road, Carlton, when he died in 1918. His father died in 1950 and his mother in 1956. Their three married daughters, Edith Moss (m. 1914), Mary Clough (m. 1922) and Madeleine Walker (m. 1926) had been appointed executors of their estates.
He was educated at the Nottingham High School from the age of 12 in January 1903 to 1905. 1911 - clerk of works in the building trade
20 Apr 1918
28
93789 - CWGC Website
Home address Gedling Road, Carlton, Nottingham
Lieutenant
11th Field Ciy Royal Engineers
11th Field Coy Royal Engineers. Frederick served initially with the Seaforth Highlanders as a private, later commissioned second lieutenant. then transferred to the Royal Engineers. He served in France from 1915 but was invalided home for periods in 1915 and 1916. Frederick died of wounds on 20 April 1918 and is buried at Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery, Belgium. He was eligible for the 1915 Star, Victory Medal and British War Medal. CWGC - History of the Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery (extract): 'Bandaghem, like Dozinghem and Mendinghem, were the popular names given by the troops to groups of casualty clearing stations posted to this area during the First World War. The cemetery site was chosen in July 1917 for the 62nd and 63rd Casualty Clearing Stations and burials from these and other hospitals (notably the 36th Casualty Clearing Station in 1918) continued until October 1918' (www.cwgc.org)
Nottingham Evening Post, Tuesday 30 April 1918: ‘Died of wounds. Lieut. F Harper, Royal Engineers, only son of Mr and Mrs TH Harper, Carlton, Notts, died of wounds on the 20th inst. He joined the Seaforth Highlanders as a private in September, 1914, and later obtained a commission in that regiment. He was invalided home from France in 1915 and 1916. A year ago he was transferred to the Royal Engineers, and has since served in France.' (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Probate; Harper Frederick Henry of Gedling-road Carlton Nottinghamshire lieutenant in HM Army died 20 April 1918 in Belgium Administration Nottingham 19 November to Thomas Henry Harper contractor. Effects £197 11s. 2d.
Remembered on

Photos

  • -
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery, Belgium. Photograph courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Frederick Henry Harper - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Haringhe (Bandaghem) Military Cemetery, Belgium. Photograph courtesy of Murray Biddle