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Person Details
Nottingham
Alfred Frederick was the son of Arthur Frederick Shaw and his wife Mary Elizabeth nee Palmer His father Arthur Frederick was born in Burton Joyce, Nottinghamshire, on 1 August 1869, the son of Alfred and Esther Shaw. He was baptised at St Helen's church, Burton Joyce, on 10 October 1869. In 1871 Alfred and Esther had the Lord Nelson public house in Burton Joyce; they had three children, Millicent (5), William Alfred (3) and Arthur Frederick (2). They later had two more children, John and Beatrice. Arthur Shaw and Mary Palmer (b. Nottingham abt. 1872) were married in 1892 (A/M/J Basford) and had three children of whom only two survived, Arthur b. 1893 (O/N/D Nottingham) and Alfred Frederick birth registered 1897 (J/F/M Nottingham). In 1901 Arthur snr. was the publican of The-Swan-with-Two-Necks, 50 Carlton Road, Nottingham, where he lived with his wife and two sons, Arthur (7) and Alfred (4). Also in the household was a general domestic servant, Annie Ashton (29). Arthur snr. and Mary were still at the pub in 1911, with their son Arthur (17) who was a bat maker and Alfred (14) who was still at school. Arthur snr. was still listed as the publican in a 1922 edition of Kelly's Directory of Nottingham although these entries are not always accurate. Alfred's mother Mary Elizabeth Shaw may have died in 1924 aged 51 and his father later married Martha (probably Hull, m. 1924 O/N/D Nottingham). Arthur snr. had the tenancy of The Nag's Head, Woodborough, Nottinghamshire, buying the public house in 1924. In 1939 he was still at the Nags Head with Martha assisting in the business. Arthur died on 11 March 1946 (J/F/M Basford) aged about 77.
He attended Mundella School, Meadows, Nottingham. Mundella Magazine, Christmas 1918, ROH: 'Shaw, Alfred, Lieut, Leicesters'.
01 Oct 1917
20
829188 - CWGC Website
Second Lieutenant
8th Bn Leicestershire Regiment
Second Lieutenant Alfred Shaw served with the 8th Battalion Leicestershire Regiment. He served in France from 5 June 1916 and was gazetted to the Leicestershire Regiment as second lieutenant in June 1917. Alfred was killed in action on 1 October 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Tyne Cot memorial (Panel 50 to 51).
Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Roll of Honour, 12 & 13 October 1917: ‘Shaw. Killed in action, October 2nd Second-Lieut. AF Shaw (Lal), Leicestershire Regiment, dearly loved cousin of Ethel Kiddier, 1 Sutton-street, Nottingham.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Roll of Honour, 13 October 1917: ‘Shaw. Killed in action, October 2nd Second-Lieut. AF Shaw (Lal), Leicestershire Regiment, nephew of AH Kiddier, 1 Sutton-street, Nottingham.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, 17 October 1917: ‘The Roll of Honour … Killed. Lieut. A Shaw. Second-Lieutenant A Shaw was gazetted to the Leicestershire Regiment in June this year.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘In Memoriam’, 2 October 1918: Shaw. In ever-lovng memory of my dear cousin, Alfred Shaw (Lal), Second-Lieut. Leicesters, killed in action October 2nd. 1917. Cousin Ethel.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘In Memoriam’, 2 October 1918: Shaw. In loving memory of our dear nephew, Alfred Shaw, Second-Lieut. Leicesters, killed in action October 2nd. 1917. Mr and Mrs A Kiddier.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Note: Mary Elizabeth Shaw's sister, Harriett Alice Palmer, married Arthur Kiddier in 1889. They were living at 1 Sutton Street, Nottingham, at the time of the 1901 and 1911 Census. In 1911 Arthur was a hosiery machine mechanic and a shop keeper (grocer and off-licence). According to the 1911 Census they had had three children, one of whom had died in infancy, and Ethel (b. abt 1896) and Arthur (b. abt 1908). Probate: Shaw Arthur Frederick of The Nags Head Inn Woodborough Nottinghamshire died 11 March 1946 Probate Nottingham 15 April to Joseph William Ireland cashier. Effects £780 11s. 8d. Public house name, 'The-Swan-with-Two-Necks': Since the 12th century the monarch has retained the right to ownership of all unmarked mute swans in open water although in practice only exercised ownership on certain stretches of the Thames. 'Swan upping' became the means of establishing a swan census. Under a 15th century Royal Charter, the Vintners' Company and the Dyers' Company, two Livery Companies of the City of London, are entitled to share in the Sovereign's ownership and it is they who conduct the census through a process of ringing the swans' feet. Originally the two companies made their own marks on the birds’ beaks: one nick for a dyers’ bird and two for a vintners’. This practice provided the pub name ‘The Swan with Two Nicks’; this is a 16th century pun, the word ‘nick’ also meaning 'neck'.
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