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Person Details
Newark
Harry Gardner was born in 1899 at Newark and was the son of William Ward a mechanic fitter and Minnie Gardner née Schofield of The Wheat Sheaf Inn Slaughter House Lane Newark. His father William Ward Gardner was born in 1873 at Hawton, Notts and his mother Minnie Schofield was born in 1873 at Newark, they were married in 1896 at Newark and had the following children all of whom were born in Newark, Arthur Isaac b1897, Harry b1899 and Albert Edward b1902. In the 1911 census the family are living at 19 Wilson Street, Newark and are shown as William Ward 38 yrs a mechanic fitter at iron foundry, he is living with his wife Minnie 38 yrs and their children, Arthur Isaac 14 yrs an errand boy, Harry 12 yrs and Albert Edward 9 yrs.
He attended the Wesleyan Day school and later Lovers’ Lane school. When he was old enough, went into the service of the Newark & District Laundry Co. before becoming an apprentice turner with Ransome & Co.
17 Jun 1918
19
530135 - CWGC Website
41451
Private
Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry
Private Harry Gardner enlisted at Newark on 21st September 1917, he initially served with the service number 337934 in the Royal Engineers, inland Water transport section, he was serving with the 1/5th Battalion Duke of Cornwall's Light Infantry, when he was killed in action on 17th June 1918. He is buried at St. Venant-Robecq Road British Cemetery, Robecq, France
Article published on 18th September 1918 in the Newark Advertiser :- Second son of William Ward Gardiner & Minnie Gardner, The Wheat Sheaf Inn, Slaughter House Lane, Newark. Born in Newark and attended the Wesleyan Day school and later Lovers’ Lane school. When he was old enough, went into the service of the Newark & District Laundry Co. before becoming an apprentice turner with Ransome & Co. With whom he remained until enlisting on Sept. 21st, 1917. He was keen on entering the RNAS but was placed in the inland Waterways & Docks section of the Royal Engineers. A bright, willing lad, he volunteered for France and was sent out in March. After arriving he was transferred to the Duke of Cornwall’s Light Infantry. Amid the hostilities for the first time on June 15th and while on a working party on the night of the 17th was struck in the head by a piece of shell. Later a photo in oak frame presented to parents by United Machine Workers Association.
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