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Person Details
Nottingham
Albert Henry was the son of James Wilson. It seems likely from information provided by James Wilson on the 1911 Census that he married twice, and that Albert and two other sons were the children of his first marriage: Albert Henry b. 1881 (A/M/J Nottingham), James b. abt 1883 and Leonard b. 1885 (O/N/D Nottingham). All three boys were born in Nottingham. In 1891 James (31), an upholsterer, was living at 8 Clayton Square, Radford, Nottingham, where he and his three sons, Albert (9), James (8) and Leonard (5), were lodgers in the household of John Beck. It seems likely that James married Sarah Ann Moore the following year (1892, O/N/D Nottingham) and in 1901 James (41) and Sarah Ann were living in Farndon, Newark, with James' two sons, Albert (19) a compositor, and Leonard (16) who was an assistant (description illegible). In 1911 James (51) a suite upholsterer, and Sarah Ann (62) were living at 63 Ronald Street, Radford. They had been married for 18 years and did not have any children. Albert married Ellen (Nellie) Browning in 1892 (J/A/S Newark). Ellen was born in Newark on 19 February 1880 (J/F/M Newark), the daughter of Leonard and Elizabeth Ellen Browning, and baptised at Lincoln St Nicholas church on 28 March 1880. Albert and Ellen had at least two children who were both born in Southwell, Leonard Eric b, 20 January 1904 (J/F/M Southwell) and Phyllis b. 19 August 1907 (J/A/S Southwell). In 1911 the family was living on Kirklington Road, Southwell; Albert (29), a letterpress compositor, Ellen (31), Leonard Eric (7) and Phyllis (3). The CWGC record gives his widow's address as 2 Meyrick Road, Newark. It is possible that Ellen remarried after Albert's death, (1) Herbert Connolly in 1925 (J/F/M Newark) and (2) Ernest Hartley in 1942 (J/F/M Newark). There is a record of the death of an Ellen Hartley (b. 1880) in 1961 (Dec Newark) aged 81. Of Albert's two children it seems likely that: Albert married and in 1939 at the time of the England & Wales Register was living at 4 Duke's Row, Newark, with his wife Elsie (b. 10 January 1910) and their daughter Joan Wilson, later McLeish (b. 31 July 1927. Leonard (b. 20 January 1904) was working as a bricklayer. He probably died in 1979 (Mar Newark) aged 75 (record gives DOB 20 January 1904). Phyllis married William Richmond in 1927 (A/M/J Newark) and in 1939 they were living in Newark. Phyllis (b. 19 August 1907) was a housewife and William (b. 28 January 1903) was a ball bearing grinder. Also in the household was their daughter Dorothy V. (b. 21 February 1939). Phyllis died on 6 May 1996 aged 88 (DOB 19 August 1907). Albert's brother Leonard may also have died in the war. There is a record on the 1911 Census of a Leonard Wilson (25, b. Nottingham), a grocer's manager, living as a boarder in the household of William and Elizabeth Kirby at 17 Foljambe Road, Brimington, near Chesterfield. He served with the 10th Bn Royal Fusiliers (lan 66054 lance corporal) and died of wounds on 16 May 1918 aged 32. He was the husband of Fanny Wilson of Palmerston Street, Underwood, Jacksdale, Nottinghamshire (CWGC). His widow, Fanny was his sole legatee.
He was a letterpress compositor.
25 Apr 1917
774570 - CWGC Website
242102
He enlisted in Derby and gave his place of residence as Southwell
Private
Border Regiment
1/5th Bn. Formerly (53435) Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire and Derbyshire Regiment). Albert was killed in action on 25 April 1917. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Arras Memorial, Pas de Calais, France.
CWGC: Son of James Wilson, of Nottingham; husband of Ellen Wilson, of 2, Meyrick Rd., Newark. Extract from the Southwell Minster Ringers Society, 'Minutes of Proceedings and Records of Peals rung 1903-1932'. May 9th 1917: 'The bells of the Minster were rung Half-Muffled as a token of respect for Pte AH Wilson who was killed in action on the Arras front on or about the 23rd April. At the suggestion of AJ Chamberlain and HF Crulow, the Archdeacon spoke of our great loss which he knew we should greatly regret as it was a terrible blow to us all. He knew it would be the wish of all the ringers that the foreman write to convey their deepest sympathy with Mrs Wilson and the children in their sad bereavement. This was silently acknowledged by the ringers standing.' (Minster's Historic Chapter Library collection) Registers of Soldiers' Effects: his widow Ellen was his sole legatee.
Remembered on