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  • Photograph was published on 14th June 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Southwell Nottinghamshire
Henry 'Harry' Croom was born in 1894 at Southwell and was the son of Thomas an iron foundry labourer and Katherine Croom née Curzon of Union Street, Nottingham. His father Thomas was born in 1860 at Newark and his mother Katherine Curzon was born in 1865 also at Newark, they were married in 1880 at Newark and went on to have 10 children, sadly two died in infancy or early childhood, their surviving children were Emma b1883 Newark, Alfred b1886 Newark, Robert B1888 Newark, Kate Elizabeth b 1892 Newark, Henry b1894 Southwell, Daisy b1896 Southwell, Leonard b1898 Southwell, and Florrie Croom b1902 Southwell In the 1911 census the family were living at 4 Union Street Beeston Nottingham and were shown as Thomas 51 yrs an iron foundry labourer, he is living with is wife 46 yrs and their children, Robert 23 yrs a grinder, Kate Elizabeth Bennett 19 yrs (married daughter) Henry 17 yrs a moulder at iron foundry, Daisy 15 yrs an assistant boot seller, Leonard 13 yrs an errand boy and Florrie 9 yrs scholar.
He was a moulder in an iron foundry later a gas fitter and then a professional soldier from August 31 1914.
20 May 1915
26
116894 - CWGC Website
13882
Private
1st Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Henry Croom enlisted in Nottingham on 31 August 1914, aged 21 years 55 days. He was 5 feet 7 inches in height. On 3 September, he was sent to the depot for recruit training and was posted to 1st battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nott's and Derby Regiment) and entered theatre (France) on 27 December. He was one of 65 all ranks who arrived at the battalion on 3 January 1915. On 9 May 1915 the battalion took part in the Battle of Aubers and attacked at 5.55 am. The lack of British artillery shells once again caused the men problems as the enemy parapets and trenches were undamaged. The enemy held the trenches in strength but despite this 'B' company managed to get within 40 yards of them, only to find the wire uncut. An 'unknown' order came to 'stop advance' and other Regiments were seen to fall back. The battalion had no choice but to do the same. At 7.35 am another attack was made but machine gun and shell fire held them up and many men lay out in the open for most of the day. At 7.30 pm the German artillery opened up with High Explosive shells and the battalion suffered heavily. They were relieved around 10 pm. Henry had been wounded by a gunshot wound to the chest at some point in the day and was moved back via the medical chain to No 16 General Hospital at Le Treport, arriving on 15th. On 20th, he 'died of wounds received in action' and was buried in Le Treport Military Cemetery, grave 2.F.2. John Morse
effects - 1 disc, 1 chain (medal and coin attached), 1 purse (broken), 1 watch (damaged), 1 title (N&D), Religious books, writing case, post cards;
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph was published on 14th June 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Henry Croom - Photograph was published on 14th June 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918