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  • photo of Robert Sidney Plant first published in the 'Retfordian' magazine following his death.
Person Details
Retford
Robert was born in 1893 the son of John Rutherford a draper/shopkeeper and Emily Jane Plant (née Hellings) of 49, Domine Cross Road, Retford. John and Emily had four children but one died prior to 1911. In 1901 and 1911, they lived at Holly Road, Ordsall, Retford. Robert’s effects of £153/5/7d were left to his father (Probate, Nottingham 17/10/1918).
He was educated at the King Edward Vi Grammar School, Retford and worked as a draper's assistant in his father's business.
17 Oct 1918
25
588297 - CWGC Website
Second Lieutenant
5th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Sydney enlisted on 14th September 1914. He was killed by shrapnel. Fresnoy-Le-Grand, Communal Cemetery Extension, Aisne, France, Grave Reference: B 12 Lieut Sydney Robert Plant Worksop Guardian 25 October 1918 'Intelligence was received at Retford yesterday, that Lieut Sydney Robert Plant of the Sherwood Foresters, had been killed in action in France. He was the eldest son of Mr and Mrs J R Plant of the Market Square and Holly Road, Retford. His younger brother is serving with the Tanks. 2nd Lieutenant Robert Sidney Plant Retford Times 1st Nov 1918 We regret to record the death of second Lieutenant Robert Sydney Plant, Sherwood Foresters, youngest son of Mr and Mrs J R Plant, the Square and Dominie Cross Road, Retford who was killed in action in France on Oct 17th. Mr Plant has received the following letter from the Lieut Colonel Commanding the Battalion, which explains the circumstances under which Lieut Plant met his death:- “I ask you to accept my sincere sympathy in the great loss you and all of us have sustained by the death of your son. He was slightly wounded and was going back to the dressing station to have his wound attended to, when he was struck by a piece of shell which burst close to him, killing him instantaneously. I can only hope that it can be some small comfort to you, that he died doing his duty like a brave British soldier, who never knew what fear meant. He was loved by every man in his platoon who are grieved at the loss of their leader.” Lieut Plant was a young man of genial disposition and was held in high esteem by all who knew him. He was educated at Retford Grammar School and when the war broke out was in business with his father. He joined up on September 14th 1914 along with a number of friends including, David and Harold Tanner, S Curtis, C R Gladish, S Lidster, Cecil Land and others. He was incapacitated with knee trouble, and was in the records office at Lichfield until he went into training for a commission, which he took in January this year. he went to France ten weeks ago and had only been out there five weeks when he met his death. Much sympathy is felt with Mr and Mrs Plant in their sad bereavement. They have another son, Lieut Charles Plant serving in France with the tanks. When war broke out he had been in Canada for four or five years working as an engineer, but he gave up his position and came over with the second Canadian contingent and saw some hard fighting at Ypres and on the Somme before taking a commission after which he was attached to the tanks.'
Retfordian, In Memoriam: 'Robert Sydney Plant, 2nd Lieut, 8th Sherwood Foresters, was killed in action in France on October 17th. he joined up on September 14th, 1914 along with a number of friends and school-fellows, including David and Harold Tanner, S Curtis, C R Gladish, S Lidster, Cecil Land and others. He was incapacitated with knee trouble, and was in the records office at Lichfield until he went into training for a commission, which he took in January this year. he went to France ten weeks ago and had only been out there five weeks when he met his death. The Lieut-Colonel commanding wrote to the young officer's father, "I ask you to accept my sincere sympathy in the great loss you and all of us have sustained by the death of your son. He was slightly wounded and was going back to the dressing station to have his wound attended to, when he was struck by a piece of shell which burst close to him, killing him instantaneously. I can only hope that it will be of some small comfort to you that he died doing his duty like a brave British solder, who never knew what fear meant. He was loved by every man in his platoon, who are grieved at the loss of their leader.'
Remembered on

Photos

  • photo of Robert Sidney Plant first published in the 'Retfordian' magazine following his death.
    Robert Sidney Plant - photo of Robert Sidney Plant first published in the 'Retfordian' magazine following his death.