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  • Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking the grave of James Mackin at Basford Cemetery. 
Courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Nottingham
James Mackin was born in 1889 at Nottingham and was the son of Thomas and Mary Ann Mackin née Clark of 5 Charles Street, Radford, Nottingham. His father Thomas Mackin was born in 1864 at Edinburgh and his wife Annie Clark was born in 1865 in Nottingham. They went on to have 11 children, sadly three were to die in infancy or early childhood. Their children were Elizabeth b1886, Thomas b1888, James b1889, Louisa Ellen b1893, Arthur b1895, Harriett Ann b1902, Henry b1904 and Annie b1905. All the children were born in Nottingham. In the 1911 census the family is living at 5 Charter Street, Radford, and are shown as Thomas 47 yrs, a cycle fitter, who is living with his wife Mary Ann 46 yrs and their children, James 22 yrs a cycle enameller, Louisa Ellen 18 yrs a wool spinner, Arthur 16 yrs a lace finisher, Harriett Ann 9 yrs, Henry 7 yrs and Annie 6 yrs. James married his wife Florence Bow in 1913 at All Souls Church, Radford, Nottingham. They went on to have the following children: Harriett b1913, Florence b1914 and James b1919. They lived at 5 Charter Street, Old Radford, Nottingham.
In 1911 he was a cycle enameller
10 Jun 1919
30
2750675 - CWGC Website
54459
Private
The Prince of Wales's Own (West Yorkshire Regiment)
James Mackin attested on 10th January 1908 in Nottingham. He gave his age as 18 yrs and 1 month on his medical examination. It was noted he had a tattoo of 'Buffalo Bill' on his right forearm. He gave his occupation as that of a coal miner. He served with the Army Service Corps and was posted to the Reserves on 9th January 1910. On the outbreak of war he was mobilised on 5th August 1915 at Bradford and posted to the Training Reserve. On 11th July 1917 he was posted to the West Yorkshire Regiment. He landed in France on 15th August 1914 and while in action at Kemmel Hill on 13th April 1918 was wounded by shrapnel in the left knee. Following an operation to remove the shrapnel he was returned to England on 31st May 1918 where he was treated in hospital for 63 days. He was discharged from the Army being unfit for service on 19th September 1918. He died on 10th June 1919 and is buried in Nottingham (New Basford) Cemetery
Personal inscription on CWGC headstone: 'O Lord let your perpetual light shine upon him.' His father Thomas Mackin also served during the Great War. He enlisted on 7th October 1915 at London; he was 46 yrs of age, a labourer and lived at 5 Charter Street, Radford, Nottingham, his next of kin was his wife Annie Mackin of the same address. He joined the Army Service Corps at Aldershot with the service number 18371. He served in the Mediterranean Expeditionary Force from 24th October 1915 until he was transferred to France on 2nd April 1916 where he served until returned to England on 10th October 1916. He was posted to the Army Reserves class 'W' on 11th February 1917. He was recalled to the colours on 31st August 1917 and served on the home front until his was medically discharged on 22nd September 1917 being no longer physically fit for service.
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking the grave of James Mackin at Basford Cemetery. 
Courtesy of Peter Gillings
    James Machin - Commonwealth War Grave Commission headstone marking the grave of James Mackin at Basford Cemetery. Courtesy of Peter Gillings