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  • Photograph was published on 17th November 1917 in the Beeston Gazette & Echo and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire
Frank was born in 1897 at Hucknall Torkard and was the son of Thomas a coal miner and Maria Louisa Baguley née Ellis living at 168 Portland Road, Hucknall. His father Thomas was born in 1858 in Farnsfield, Nottinghamshire and his mother Maria Loiusa Ellis was also born in 1858 in Nottingham. They were married in 1887 their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration District, they went on to have 8 children , 1 sadly was to die in early childhood, their surviving children were all born in Hucknall and were Elizabeth b1878, Kate b1882, William b1887, Ada b1889, John Charles b1891, Sydney b1894 and Frank b1897. In the 1911 census the family are living at 168 Portland Road, Hucknall and are shown as Thomas 53 yrs a coal miner , he is living with his wife Maria Louisa 53 yrs and their children William 24 yrs a coal miner, Ada 22 yrs a milliner, Charles 20 yrs a coal miner, Sydney 17 yrs a frame smith and Frank 14 yrs a scholar.
23 Oct 1917
21
433698 - CWGC Website
M2/175288
Private
Army Service Corps
Private Frank Baguely, enlisted at Hucknall and served with the Army Service Corps, he was attached to the 4th Australian Supply Column, he died of wounds at No. 2 Canadian Casualty Clearing Station on 23rd October 1917. He is buried in Lijssenthoek Military Cemetery.
Article published 17th November 1917 in the Beeston Gazette & Echo :- “Mr. and Mrs. Baguley, of Portland road, Hucknall, have received a hard blow by the intelligence of the death of their son Frank in the prime of his youth and with every prospect of making his mark in life. “The deceased was employed by Mr. S. H. Plattin, chemist, Derby road, Nottingham, and no lad could have a better testimonial than that given him by his master, who, as will be seen below, has sent a letter to the parents. He enlisted in the Army Service Corps some 17 months ago, and has been in France practically ever since being a second driver at the time of his death, the circumstances of which are narrated in letters now to hand. Frank Baguley was 21 years of age, and had many local friends, who admired his steady, plodding methods, and deeply sympathise his with the parents in the calamity which has befallen them. “The letter from Mr. Plattin contains the following sentences: – “Dear Mr. and Mrs. Baguley, I cannot express to you how grieved both Mrs. Plattin and myself are to hear of the terribly sad news of the death of your boy Frank. We can quite feel what an awful blow it must be to you all, and would ask you to accept our sincerest and heartfelt sympathy in your great sorrow. Knowing Frank as we did, we can only look back and think with so much regret that another grand life has been sacrificed in the cause of liberty and justice. Without a single doubt, he was the best lad I ever had with me, and during the whole of the note he never gave me a moment's anxiety, nor had I to find a single fault with him. “The officer communicates the following details of his death: “He was second driver on the column ration lorry, and was at the time engaged in delivering the rations to a detachment in a dangerous part of the war zone. His lorry was being loaded when a shell dropped in a house close to him, and he was badly wounded. He was at once removed to the hospital, but died soon afterwards. He was a good soldier, and always willing and cheerful. “Lieut. Watson sends the following information: “On the afternoon of 21st October he was delivering petrol and rations to an advanced detachment. They had just finished unloading the lorrry, [sic] and were to go into a dug-out until some rather heavy shelling was over, when a shell burst amongst several of them, killing five and wounding two. Your son was one of the two wounded, and was removed immediately to a dressing station, and was afterwards conveyed to the casualty clearing station. There he died of wounds in the chest, and arms, and I think I am right in in saying he never regained consciousness. I saw him buried with military honours after a short service. My feeling of personal regard for your son makes it possible for me in some measure to realise your loss, and I, therefore. venture to offer my heartfelt sympathy in your grief.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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  • Photograph was published on 17th November 1917 in the Beeston Gazette & Echo and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Frank Baguley - Photograph was published on 17th November 1917 in the Beeston Gazette & Echo and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918