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  • Wooden memorial plaque in St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall, courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Hucknall,Nottingham
William Henry was born in 1896 in Hucknall and was the son William Chadbund a coal miner and of Eliza Ann Chadbund née Moore . His father William was born in 1876 in Hedenesford, Staffordshire, his mother Eliza Ann Moore was born in 1877 in Basford, they were married in 1895 their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration area they had 6 children all born in Hucknall William Henry b1896 , Elizabeth b1898, Edgar b1901, Ella b1907 ,Thomas b1902 and Lucy Chadbund b 1910 they lived at 30 Washdyke Lane Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire. His mother re married in 1915 to Thomas Shaw their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration District.
He was a colliery banksman working on the surface in 1911 he was working at Newstead Colliery
23 Jul 1916
20
1542861 - CWGC Website
19361
Private
1st Bn Northamptonshire Regiment
Private William Chadbund, enlisted in Nottingham initially served with service number 125265 with the Sherwood Foresters Regiment , he was later transferred tot he 1st Battalion Northamptonshire Regiment, he was killed in action on 23rd July 1916. He is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
“Another Hucknall soldier to be numbered amongst those now sleeping 'neath foreign skies is Private William Chadburn, Belvoir street, who was in the Northants. Regiment. He was 20 years of age, and was employed at Newstead Colliery before the war. He soon made up his mind that his place was in the army. for in its early days he responded to the call, and when his turn came for France he went with a brave heart, which he maintained to the end. which came on July 24th [sic] at Contalmaison, where so many heroes fell in the big push. Chadburn's parents were first informed of their loss by Charlie Turton, who had always kept in touch with the deceased. In his letter from France on July 25th Turton says he was killed instantly by a shell whilst in the front trenches, bravely doing his duty. He felt as though he could have dropped when he heard the news, for he was a ray of sunshine, so honest and so young. “As fate would have it, two days later Turton himself was wounded, and is now in a hospital at Bournebrook, Birmingham. He writes from there, giving further particulars as follows: — “Dear Mrs. Chadburn, — I now take the opportunity of writing a few lines to express my deep sympathy with you and my own sorrow at the loss of your dear son and a dear friend of mine while fighting for his country in the great war. I know it was a hard blow to you and only those who sustain such a loss can realise the heartbreaks and sorrow it causes. During my long stay in France, Bill was the only one from old Hucknall whom I really saw much of. When we were close enough together we would look each other up and spend an hour or two together talking Hucknall news. These times to me were the happiest I had in France. Bill was always like a ray of sunshine to me and I know he liked nothing more than a chat of home with me. I always found him one of the best, as honest as could be and one who loved his mother and all at home. I can only give a few brief details as to his death. Our Brigade was in action in the Big Push, and we were in the Contalmaison district. The day before he fell he sent word to me by one of my mates in these words, “Don't forget to tell Charlie I am all right.” We came out of action on Monday, the 24th, and the following day one of his company mates stopped me in the town of Albert and told me that he was killed. I could scarcely believe him and with a sad heart I went and found his company headquarters and got what particulars I could. It was on the Sunday or Monday morning. He was in an advanced sap with several others when a shell fell amongst them and four were killed, and the others very badly injured. They had not been able to find out much as to how it really did happen, but they said that the regiment would forward all particulars and personal property in due course. From what I could ,gather he was buried in front of Contalmaison marked by a cross. I got wounded in the right arm two days later and was brought to England. I wish it had been Bill's lot to escape like me, but God willed it differently. When I get home I will come and see you and hope you will accept my heartfelt sympathy in the loss of dear Bill, who I always found home-loving, straight, and true, and a character beyond reproach. — Yours sincerely, CHARLIE TURTON.” Above article is from Ibid and ic courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • Wooden memorial plaque in St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall, courtesy of Peter Gillings
    William Henry Chadbund - Wooden memorial plaque in St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall, courtesy of Peter Gillings
  • Photograph was published 31st August 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    William Henry Chadbund - Photograph was published 31st August 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918