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  • Photograph published 7th November 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire
Charles Mason was born in 1897 at Hucknall and was the son of John a colliery labourer and Harriet Mason née Cordwell of 21 Orchard Street, Hucknall, Nottingham. His father John was born in 1862 at Hucknall and his mother Harriett Cordwell was born in 1864 also at Hucknall, they were married in 1889 their marriage was recorded in the Basford registration district, they went on to have 9 children two of whom died in infancy, their surviving children were Matilda b1891, Ann b1895, Charles b1897, Frank b1898, Amy May b1901, Elizabeth b1903 and Esther Mason b1905. In the 1911 census the family lived at 21 Orchard Street Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire and were shown as John 49 yrs a colliery labourer he is living with his wife Harriett 47 yrs and their children, Matilda 20 yrs a lace dresser, Ann 16 yrs a hosiery hand, Charles 14 yrs a colliery stable boy, Frank 13 yrs a newsboy, Amy May 10 yrs a scholar, Elizabeth 8 yrs and Esther 6 yrs of age.
He was a colliery stable boy below ground in 1911.
20 Sep 1918
22
236099 - CWGC Website
29189
Private
The Buffs (East Kent Regiment)
Pte. Charles Mason, was conscripted on 19th April 1918 at Hucknall and served with the 7th battalion The Buffs (East Kent Regiment,) He landed in France on 8th August 1918 and was killed in action on 20th September 1918. He is buried in Villers-Faucon Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Article published in the Hucknall Dispatch 7th November 1918 :- “He joined the Army on April 19 of this year, [1918] and received his training at Cleavdon Camp, near Sunderland, where he was well-liked by all. Leaving the camp on August 7 for France, he was soon in action with the Buffs, though he received his training with the 3rd Sherwoods. He had not been in the fighting zone six weeks when he was wounded in the head, eventually causing his death. “Prior to joining the Army the deceased worked at Linby Colliery, where he always bore a good name among the officials. He also attended the University at Nottingham, having gained a scholarship at the local evening school. No doubt he would have made his mark in the world, for he was only 20 years of age, and spent all his spare time in studies. Needless to say his death came as a great blow to his parents and friends.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph published 7th November 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Charles Manson - Photograph published 7th November 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918