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  • The commonwealth wargraves commission headstone marking the grave of Stanley Smith in St Mary Magdalene Churchyard at Creswell, Derbyshire courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Monk Bretton, Yorkshire
Stanley Smith was born in 1899 in Monk Bretton, Yorkshire and was the son of Willie a coal miner and Francis Annie Smith , of 21, Model Village, Creswell. His father Willie was born in 1872 in Hoyland Common, Yorkshire and his mother Frances Annie was born in Monk Bretton Yorkshire they were married c1896 and went on to have 5 children, Gladys b1897 Monk Bretton, Stanley b1899 Monk Bretton, Lawrence b1903 Creswell, Edith Annie b1905 Creswell and William Arthur b1910 Creswell. In the 1911 census the family are living at 21 Model Village, Creswell, Derbyshire and are shown as William 39 yrs a coal miner , he is living with his wife Frances Annie 34 yrs and their children, Gladys 14 yrs, Stanley 12 yrs, Lawrence 8 yrs, Edith Annie 6 yrs and William Arthur 1 year.
31 Jul 1918
19
351349 - CWGC Website
58665
Mansfield
Private
Leicestershire Regiment
Private Stanley Smith enlisted at Chesterfield whilst residing at Mansfield he served with the 4th battalion Leicestershire Regiment, whilst stationed at North Coates, Lincolnshire he was killed on 31st July 1918 when a mine washed up on the shore exploded killing him and three of his friends He is buried in Creswell (St. Mary Magdalene) Churchyard together with his 3 friends
Article published 5th August 1918 in the Nottingham Evening Post :- PLAYING WITH A MINE. “FOUR NOTTS. AND DERBYSHIRE MEN KILLED. “An inquest was held coast town with reference to the deaths of four soldiers — John Henry Sharp [1], 21, Stanley Smith [2], 19, Harold Moseley [3], 19, and Arthur White [4], 19 — three of whom hailed from Creswell and other from Mansfield. “Evidence was given to the effect that the four men were seen on the shore [5] playing with a mine which had washed up. They were hitting it with a stick, one of them gave it a kick, saying that it was empty. Another soldier told them they were foolish, but they said it was all right. The mine exploded and the four men were blown to pieces. “The verdict was to the effect that they were “killed accidentally.” 1] Pte. John Henry Sharp is buried in Creswell (St. Mary Magdalene) Churchyard. [2] Pte. Stanley Smith was the son of Willie and Francis Annie Smith, of 21 Model Village, Creswell. He is buried in Creswell (St. Mary Magdalene) Churchyard. [3] Pte. Harold Mosley was the son of James and Edith Mosley of Creswell. He is buried in Creswell (St. Mary Magdalene) Churchyard. [4] Pte. Arthur White was the son of Arthur and Mary Jane White, of 10 Bullivant Avenue, Creswell. He is buried in Creswell (St. Mary Magdalene) Churchyard. [5] They were stationed at North Coates, Lincolnshire. Article published 10th August 1918 in the Derbyshire Courier :- “AFFECTING SCENES. “Creswell Victims of Mine Explosion. “THE FUNERAL. “Amid widespread feelings of sympathy and respect the remains were interred in the Creswell Churchyard, on Sunday, [4th August 1918] of the four Creswell victims of the mine explosion which occurred near an East Coast training camp, [Pyes Hall, North Somercotes, Lincolnshire] on Wednesday of last week.[31st July 1918] Their names are: Pte. Sydney Smith (19), eldest son of Mr. and Mrs. W. Smith, 21 New Village, Creswell; Pte. H. Mosley (19), son of Mr. Mosley, 23 New Village, Creswell; Pte. J. H. Sharpe (21), son of Mr. and Mrs. Sharpe, 15 Duchess street, Creswell; and Pte. Arthur White, 30 Duchess street, Creswell. The bodies reached Creswell by special train on Saturday, [3rd August 1918] the coffins covered with the Union Jack, being conveyed in the colliery ambulance van to the fire station to await internment. A detachment of the Creswell Ambulance Brigade acted as bearers. Arrangements for the funeral were made by Mr. S. Evans, J.P., the colliery manager, whose servies in this respect were highly appreciated. The funeral was of a semi-military character, a large detachment with buglers from a neighbouring camp attending, while there were also representatives of the local Volunteers and of the Leicester Battalion to which the deceased belonged. The Creswell Ambulance Brigade, under Sergt. Walden, also attended, and some 26 members of the Creswell branch of the Federation of Discharged and Demobilised Sailors and Solders, acted as bearers. Others present included Mr. S. Evans., Mr. F. Limb, Mr. J. Ball, and Mr. W. Vaughan. The service in the church and at the graveside was taken by the Vicar (the Rev. J. E. Pagett). The coffins were placed side by side in one grave, and some affecting scenes were witnessed as they were lowered to their last resting-place. An impressive service concluded with the sounding of the “Last Post” by the buglers. “The mourners were: –– “Private. S. Smith. “The parents, Mrs. Machen (sister), Mr. Lawrence Smith, Arthur Smith, and Edith Smith (brothers and sister), Mrs. John Bennett, Mrs. Nash, Mr. and Mrs. A. Rogers, Mr. and Mrs. O. Hazleby, Mr. C. Burton, Clement and Charlie Burton, Mr. C. Mills, Pte. A.Hancock, Mr. Chas. Howe, and Mr. Tom Robinson. Floral tributes were sent by the parents and family, Mrs. Machen, Creswell Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, officials and workmen of the Creswell Colliery, officers and N.C.O.'s of the regiment, Mr. and Mrs. Rogers, and Mrs. Jackson. “Private H. Mosley. “Mourners: Father and sister, Miss Mosley, Messrs. Alert, Harry, Charles, and Reg. Mosley, and Miss S. E. Mosley (brothers and sister), Mrs. F. Mosley (sister-in-law), Mr. and Mrs. Joe Mosley, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Mosley (uncles and aunts), Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Mosley, Messrs. Dick and W. Mosley, Miss Nancy Mosley, Mr. Joe Mosley, and Mr. Ben Mosley (cousins), Mr. and Mrs. Foulkes, Mrs. Hancock, Mrs. Bakewell, Mr. W. Morris, and Willie Morris, Mr. Charles Foulkes, Mr. John Westwood, and Mr. W. Meakin. Floral tributes: The parent and family, Aunt Annie and Uncle Joe, Uncle Ben and Aunt Ellen, Officials and Workmen of the Creswell Colliery, Officers and Non-Coms. of the regiment. “Pte. J. H. Sharpe. “Mourners: The parents, Misses Alice and Sarah Sharpe, and Messrs. Ernest and Maurice Sharpe (brothers and sisters), Wilfred Sharpe and Harry Parkin (cousins), Messrs. Walter Swift, Jack Clifford, and Albert Ellis (friends), Ptes. W. Harrison, Mitchell, and Brown, from the Training Camp, Mr. and Mrs. J. Spotwood, Mrs. J. Smith, and Eliza, Mr. and Mrs. Syson, Mansfield, Mrs. Cooling, Mrs. Rhyles, Mrs. Wood, and Mrs. Lowe. Misses Lena and Ada Tomlinson (Clowne), Mrs. Tomlinson and Mrs. Fulwood (Clowne), Messrs. W. Kerry and W. H. Shepherd (workmates), Mr. and Mrs. F. Mitchell, Mr. and Mrs. Kingston, Mr. and Mrs. Harrison (Creswell). Floral tributes: Parents and family; Pals – Pte. H. Fox (on active service), Messrs. J. Clifford, W. Swift, A. Ellis, and A. Mosley; Lena and Ada, Mr. and Mrs. Swift and family, Mr. and Mrs. Smith and Eliza (Rose and Crown), Pte. Roddington (Marines), neighbours and friends (2), official and workmen of the Creswell Colliery, Officers and Non-Commissioned Officers of the regiment, Creswell Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, Mr. and Mrs. Alec Syson, Mr. Tomlinson and family, Aunts and Uncles from Codnor, National Deposit Friendly Society, Creswell Social Club, and Mr. W. H. Shepherd. “Private Arthur White. Mourners: Parents, Mrs. White (grandmother), Mrs. E. Ward and Mrs. T. Ward (Whitwell aunts), Mr. and Mrs. Cutts, Doncaster (grandparents), Mrs. Shaw and Mrs. Saxton (Doncaster aunts), Mr. and Mrs. Cutts (Kirkby), Mr. and Mrs. Cutts (Creswell, aunts and uncles), Sylvester, James, Robert, Gwladys, Irene, Fennetta, Alberta, and Francis Christopher (brother and sisters), Mr. Rose and Mr. Banham, Mr. Maltby (cousin), Pte. Herbert Slater, Pte. Turner, Mr. B. Nash, Mr. F. Darby, Pte. Dodd, Mr. Victor Chambers, Mr. M. Vickers, Mr. P. Waller, and others. Floral tributes: Parents and family, Neighbours and Friends, Officers and Non-Coms. of the regiment, Officials and Men of the Creswell Colliery, Discharged Sailors and Soldiers, Sybil, Rose, and Gertie Banham. “Inquest Story. “An inquest was held at a coast town with reference to the deaths of the four soldiers. “Evidence was given to the effect that the four men were seen on the shore near a mine which had washed up. They were hitting it with a stick, and one of them gave it a kick, saying it was empty. Another soldier told them they were foolish, but they said it was all right. The mine exploded, and the four men were blown to pieces. “The verdict was to the effect that they were killed accidentally.” Above articles and information are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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Photos

  • The commonwealth wargraves commission headstone marking the grave of Stanley Smith in St Mary Magdalene Churchyard at Creswell, Derbyshire courtesy of Peter Gillings
    Stanley Smith - The commonwealth wargraves commission headstone marking the grave of Stanley Smith in St Mary Magdalene Churchyard at Creswell, Derbyshire courtesy of Peter Gillings
  • Four commonwealth wargraves commission headstones for Stanley Smith and friends at St Mary Magdalene Churchyard, Creswell, Derbyshire courtesy of Peter Gillings
    Stanley Smith - Four commonwealth wargraves commission headstones for Stanley Smith and friends at St Mary Magdalene Churchyard, Creswell, Derbyshire courtesy of Peter Gillings