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  • Photograph was published on 29th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
7 Mile House Papplewick Nottinghamshire
Charles Sampson Stubbs was born in 1895 at Papplewick, he was the son of Arthur a farm baliff and Hannah Stubbs née Tagg of The Misk Hucknall ,Nottinghamshire. His father Arthur was born in 1864 in Papplewick and his mother Hannah Tagg was born in 1865 in Lambley, they were married in 1894, their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration District, they went on to have 8 children one of which died in infancy , their surviving children were, Charles Sampson b1895 Papplewick, Walter b1898 Papplewick, Annie b1902 Halam, Arthur b1906 Halam, Hannah b1906 Hucknall , Lucy b1908 Hucknall and William Stubbsb1910 Hucknall In 1911 census the family lived at The Misk, Hucknall and were shown as Arthur 47 yrs a farm baliff, he is living with his wife Hannah 46 yrs and their children, Charles 16 yrs a waggoner, Walter 13 yrs a farm lad, Annie 9 yrs a scholar, Arthur 7 yrs a scholar, Hannah 5yrs a scholar, Lucy 3 yrs and William 1 year.
He was a farm wagoner.
04 Aug 1918
23
587160 - CWGC Website
44810
Driver
Royal Field Artillery
Driver Charles Sampson Stubbs enlisted at Hucknall , he served with the 140th Bde, Royal Field Artillery. He landed in France on 25th August 1915 and was killed in action on 4th August 1918 he is buried in Boves West Communal Cemetery, Somme, France. grave reference A.5.
Dvr. Charles Samson Stubbs, “D” Battery, 104th Brigade Royal Field Artillery, died in his captain’s arms after being wounded in the back by shellfire on 4th August 1918. Two letters from his comrades were published in the local press(Hucknall Dispatch 29th August 1918 ). The first was from an anonymous letter from a Second Lieutenant. “Dear Mrs Stubbs It is with the greatest grief that I tell you of your son’s death. He was killed on the night of August 4-5 while taking up ammunition. Unfortunately, a shell landed right beside his team, and a large piece entered the small of his back. The captain and myself carried him from his horses, and within two minutes he died painlessly in the captain’s arms. I have a mother myself, and I can understand your feelings, but, Mrs Stubbs, have courage; you will always know that he died honourably, fighting for his country. I shall miss him very much, for his face was always a cheerful one, and he was the nicest lad in his sub-section. His horses (who will miss him also) and harness were a credit to him, which again in its turn is a credit to his mother. He was buried in a cemetery at Baves, [sic] near Amiens, and all who could be spared were present, for he was a general favourite.” Anonymous letter from a fellow member of his Battery: “I do not think there was a boy in the Battery more respected than he was by the officers and men. His cheery disposition, courage, and devotion to duty were the things that counted with Charlie. And these fine traits of character won for him a warm place in our hearts. He was buried with military honours at a French cemetery. A good number of his comrades paid him their last tribute of respect. I know your trial is great, and I pray that God may sustain you in your hour of grief.” Above aricle is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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  • Photograph was published on 29th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Charles Sampson Stubbs - Photograph was published on 29th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918