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  • The commonwealth wargrave headstone marking the grave of 
Patrick John Jobe at St Helen's church at Oldcoates. 
photo courtesy of Colin Dannatt
Person Details
Clonmel, Tipperary, Ireland
Patrick John Jobe was born in Conmel, Ireland in 1887 and in 1901 he was a resident of a house in Skeheenaranky, Coolagarranroe, Tipperary. He was one of about 160 male Roman Catholic residents aged between 11 and 15. He is known to have joined the Army, enlisting at Conmel, before leaving Ireland. By at least early 1910, he was in England as he married Edith Emily Percy at Guilford, Surrey. The next year they had a daughter who they named Gladys, born at Farnham. By April 1911 Patrick is recorded as serving with the Royal Irish Regiment, 2nd Battalion and was stationed at Fort George, Guernsey, where he had his wife and daughter with him, living at 10 Hautevill Street. A second daughter was born to the couple in early 1914 back in Guilford, Surrey. She was named Edith Christina, but she died the following year, 1915.
21 Oct 1914
29
2750785 - CWGC Website
8398
Lance Corporal
2nd Bn Royal Irish Regiment
Information is not to hand as to when Patrick joined the Army but as a regular soldier he would have gone to France with the 2nd Battalion in the 14th August 1915. (his medal card indicates this as he was awarded the 1914 star). Shortly after this he was wounded seriously enough to be returned to England. He was hospitalised at Lady Galway’s Auxiliary Military Hospital, Serlby Hall, Nottinghamshire. He never recovered and died on the 21st October 1914 his funeral and burial being at St Helen’s Catholic Church in the nearby village of Oldcotes which his wife attended. His name appears on the WW1 memorial in Guilford, Surrey. L/Cpl Patrick John Jobe Retford Times 6th Nov 1914 'Military funeral at Oldcotes The remains of Patrick Jobe of the 2nd Royal Irish Rifles, who died at Lady Galway’s Auxiliary Military Hospital, Serlby Hall on October 21st, were laid to rest with Military Honours at Oldcotes, the service being of a most impressive char-acter. The body was conveyed from Serlby Hall in a gun carriage, the coffin being covered with the Union Jack. The cortege was met at St Helen’s Church by the Rev Joseph Sturton, who conducted. Amongst those present was the widow (Mrs Jobe), Lady Galway, the vicar of Blyth (the Rev A Lloyd Phillips), Dr Emerson Lee. The Rev J Stourton who took for his text the words “It is a holy and wholesome thought to pray for the dead, that they may be loosed from their sin.” Delivered an impressive and touching address. The preacher said that the brave soldier they were about to convey to his last resting place had died for his King and country, and many eyes were filled with tears, particularly when he said “Take him up tenderly, bear him out reverently to the grave where amidst our tears and prayers we will bury him and then take a last sad farewell and leave him like a warrior taking his rest.” As the funeral party left the church Mr Charles Booth played the Dead March in “Saul.” The coffin was borne to its last resting place by wounded soldiers from Viscountees Galway’s Auxiliary Military Hospital, and after the last sad rites had been performed a firing party from Retford fired over the grave, and the “Last Post” was sounded. Wreaths were sent by Lady Galway, the Rev A L Phillips, vicar of Blyth and the nurses at the hospital. The deceased, whose home was at Guilford, Surrey, leaves a widow and two children'.
Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on

Photos

  • The commonwealth wargrave headstone marking the grave of 
Patrick John Jobe at St Helen's church at Oldcoates. 
photo courtesy of Colin Dannatt
    Patrick John Jobe - The commonwealth wargrave headstone marking the grave of Patrick John Jobe at St Helen's church at Oldcoates. photo courtesy of Colin Dannatt