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  • Photograph was published in the Hucknall Dispatch on 27th July 1916 and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknal 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall
Thomas Walters was born in 1894 at Hucknall and was the son of Thomas a coal miner and his second wife and Louisa Ann Walters née Waterfield of 20 Ladycroft Avenue, Hucknall, Nottinghamshire). His father was born in 1859 at Spenneymoor, County Durham, he had previously been married to Isabella Richardson (born 1861) they were married in 1877 at Auckland County Durham, they went on to have the following children all born in County Durham, Elizabeth b1879, John b1881. James b1884 and Susannah b1888. Isabella Walters died in 1893 her death was recorded in the Basford Registration District, she was 32 yrs of age. Thomas Walters then remarries in 1893 to Louisa Ann Waterfield, they went on to have the following children, Thomas b1894 and Gladys May b1896 both born IN Hucknall. In the 1911 census the family are living at 54 Beardall Street, Hucknall and are shown as Thomas 52 yrs a coal miner, he is living with his wife Louisa Ann 44 yrs and his children, Isabella 20 yrs a laundry ironer, Thomas 17 yrs a coal miner and Gladys May 15 yrs a dress maker.
He was a pit pony driver.
06 Jul 1916
22
818969 - CWGC Website
20530
Private
14th Bn Royal Welsh Fusiliers
Private Thomas Walters, enlisted Hucknall and served with the 14th Battalion Royal Welsh Fusiliers. He landed in France on 1st December 1915 and was was killed in action on 6th July 1916. Having no known grave his name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial.
An article published on 27th July 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch :- Sgt. Thomas Woodhouse, also from Hucknall, wrote to Walters’ parents with the news of his death from his hospital bed, having himself been wounded during the Welsh Division’s attack on Mametz Wood a few days later. “Dear Mr & Mrs Walters and All, “If you have not already heard, I am writing to inform you of the death of your son, Thomas, who was killed in action on the 6th inst. I know it will be a hard blow to you all, but he fought like a Britisher fights. Alongside nearly a half of his platoon, he met his death by a shell. We were talking together only a few minutes before his end came. We were in the part of the line where the British had advanced only a few days previously, and the Germans bombarded us something awful: in fact it was impossible to exist. Luckily, I escaped uninjured but for a shock by those ten cwt shells the Germans use on us. “On the 10th inst. we were ordered to charge the enemy at 4 a.m. Needless to say, our boys never flinched when they knew they had to go into that awful trap. Every man with set teeth and rifle gripped tightly, went over to avenge the deaths of our poor lads who had been killed only a few days previously. During the charge I was hit in the left side of my back, and am now lying in hospital at the base. I think I am improving a little, but the metal has not yet been removed. Please try and cheer up. I know it’s hard for you all: in fact it is to me to lose such an affectionate comrade. “Please believe me to be, Yours sincerely, “Sgt. Frank Woodhouse.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph was published in the Hucknall Dispatch on 27th July 1916 and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknal 1914-1918
    Thomas Walters - Photograph was published in the Hucknall Dispatch on 27th July 1916 and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknal 1914-1918
  • Wooden memorial plaque in St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall, courtesy of Peter Gillings
    Thomas Walters - Wooden memorial plaque in St Mary Magdalene Church, Hucknall, courtesy of Peter Gillings