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  • Photograph is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire
Alfred Watson was born in 1895 at Hucknall and was the son of Alfred (senior) a colliery worker and Kate Watson née Oscroft of 5 Bentinck Street Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire. His father Alfred (senior) was born in 1857 at Calverton and his mother Kate Oscroft was born in 1855 in Sutton in Ashfield, they were married in 1876 their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration District, they went on to have 11 children, sadly 6 were to die in infancy or early childhood, their surviving children all born in Hucknall were, Henry b1877, Joseph b1879, Walter b1885, Alfred b1895 and Lucy Kate b1898. In the 1911 census the family are living at 5 Bentinck Street, Hucknall and are shown as Alfred 54 yrs a underground worker at Linby colliery, he is living with his wife Kate 56 yrs and their children, Alfred 16 yrs a pony driver at Linby Colliery, Lucy Kate 13 yrs.
He was a pit pony driver at Linby Collier
22 Oct 1917
23
154420 - CWGC Website
23101
Private
15th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Private Alfred Watson enlisted at Nottingham served at Gallipoli with 9th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment. He was wounded in July 1917 and was serving with the 15th battalion Sherwood Foresters when he died of wounds on 22nd October 1917. He is buried at Dozingham Military Cemetery.
Article published 15th November 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch :- Alfred Watson. Like many other local men, he joined the gallant Sherwood Foresters, and was trained at Sunderland. He then went out to Egypt, where he spent his 21st birthday. He was next sent to France from the land of the Pharaohs, and was over two years away from home, not being granted a leave even before going to France. “Nevertheless, he stuck to his task in facing the foe, and last July had a bayonet wound. Pte. Watson was single, and locally was well-known as a good footballer. “A letter from the matron to the deceased's sister states: “Your brother was severely wounded in the chest and leg, and although everything was done for him he passed away on October 22. He was too ill to realise he was dying, and did not suffer much. He was very brave and patient.” “The Church of England chaplain writes: He was admitted to the Casualty Clearing Station suffering from shrapnel wounds in the chest. All that skill and care can do was done for him by our sisters and doctors, who assure me that he was too ill to feel much pain.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Alfred Watson - Photograph is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Dozingham Military Cemetery . Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Alfred Watson - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking his grave at Dozingham Military Cemetery . Courtesy of Murray Biddle