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  • Photograph was published 15th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall Tokard Nottinghamshire.
Thomas Worrall was born in 1894 at Hucknall and was the son of Thomas a coal miner and Hannah Worrall née Shooter of 60 Hankin Street, Hucknall. His father Thomas was born in 1870 at Staffordshire and his mother Hannah Shooter was born in 1869 at Hucknall, they were married in 1890 their marriage was recorded in the Basford Registration district, they had 12 children, sadly 4 died in infnacy or early childhood, their children were William b1892, Thomas b1894, James Henry b1896, Florence May b1898, Walter b1902, Ernest Moses b1906,Mary Ann and Elizabeth Worrall both born in 1909 all were born in Hucknall. In the 1911 census the family lived at 60 Hankin Street Butler's Hill Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire and were shown as Thomas 41 yrs a coal miner hewer he is living with his wife Hannah 42 yrs and their children William 19 yrs a coal miner hewer, Thomas 17 yrs a coal miner road lad, James Henry 15 yrs a colliery banksman, Florence Mary 13 yrs a scholar, Walter 9 yrs a scholar, Ernest Moses 5 yrs , Mary Ann 2 yrs and Elizabeth 2 yrs.
In 1911 he was a coal miner lad pony driver.
25 Apr 1918
24
875851 - CWGC Website
95751
Lance Bombardier
Royal Field Artillery
Lance Bombardier Thomas Worrall, served with "B" Battery, 51st Brigade Royal Field Artillery, who died of wounds on 25th April 1918. Having no known grave his name is commemorated on Tyne Cot Memorial,
An article published on 15th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch reads :- “The third photograph is of Bomb. Thomas Worrall, the son of Mr. and Mrs. T. Worrall, 60, Hankin street, Hucknall, who has given his life for this country. He was one of the first to volunteer in the early days of the war in 1914, and commenced his training in the Royal Field Artillery. After gaining knowledge of the guns, he was sent out to France, where he spent three years before making the supreme sacrifice. Previously he was employed at Newstead pit, and was well-known in the district. As extracts from letters indicate, he met his death on April 25 of this year, being 25 years of age. We may say that of other sons, Harry is still in France, while William has been discharged from the Army. “A letter from Sec.-Lieut. W. Wright, the commander of the section in which Thomas Worrall served, states that on the morning of April 25 the enemy was heavily attacking the front covered by their battery, and at the same time directing heavy fire on their position. Bomb. Worrall was serving his gun, helping to repel the attacks, when he was wounded in the stomach. Everything possible was done for him, but he died on the way to the dressing station. He was buried at Dickebusch, near Ypres. The officer added that he had known Bomb. Worrall or over eight months, and had always shown the same pluck and devotion to duty as he did on the morning he met his death. He died a true hero without a thought for himself. His one object was to fire his gun and help his comrades, who were so hardly pressed in the front trenches. “A letter has also come to hand from his pal in Durham, stating that he was conscious after being hit, and died with a smile on his face, contented to know that he had done his bit.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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  • Photograph was published 15th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Thomas Worrall - Photograph was published 15th August 1918 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918