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  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Sanctuary Wood Cemetery Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
Person Details
Mansfield Woodhouse.
Parents: Albert and Frances Robinson of Woodland Grove, Mansfield Woodhouse.
12 Jul 1915
19
477959 - CWGC Website
1641
Woodland Grove, Mansfield woodhouse.
Private
1/8th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Private Ernest Robinson, served with the 1/8th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment. He was in France from February 1915 . He was killed in action on 12th July 1915. Buried in Sanctuary Wood Cemetery,
Letter from his commanding officer printed in Mansfield Chronicle Advertiser, 29/07/1915 giving details of Ernest's death. " a bullet struck him below the left shoulder and he went downwards, and died almost immediately. He died a good soldier" Article published 30th July 1915 in the Mansfield Reporter and Sutton Times :- MANSFIELD WOODHOUSE PRIVATE KILLED. “The photograph is that of Private Ernest Robinson, who, we are sorry to learn, was killed on Tuesday, the 13th inst. He was the only son of Mr. and Mrs. Albert Robinson, of 14, Woodland Grove, to whom we tender our sympathy. An official intimation of his death was received by letter from his sergeant (Sergt. J. Childs) in which he wrote — “It is with deepest regret that I have to tell you that your son Ernest was shot on Tuesday afternoon. The shot entered just between the left shoulder blade, and went downwards, and he died almost immediately. He died a good soldier, and was very much respected by all the Company.” The young hero was in the 8th Battalion of Sherwood Foresters, and was only 19 years of age. He had hoped to spend his 20th birthday in August at home. Being in the Territorials prior to the war, he was in camp at Scarborough when the Colours were mobilised. He then remained at home for about a week. He did not actually reach France until the 2nd March. [1] His parents have received many beautiful letters from him, and one we had the pleasure of inserting in our columns which he sent to his grandfather, Mr. Cooncillod Wm. Robinson, some weeks ago. He had a bright and cheerful disposition. which alone would help his comrades as they fought side by side. He has been much in the firing line, and in one letter he wrote. “We are only 50 yards from the Huns.” “Another of our village's brave sons, John Newton, was with him near the last, in fact only a few minutes before he fell a cheery remark was passed between them. Before the war, young Robinson was an employee of the Mansfield Light Railway Company, and was much liked by all his workmates.” [1] That is the day the battalion arrived in France. Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Sanctuary Wood Cemetery Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Ernest Robinson - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking his grave at Sanctuary Wood Cemetery Belgium. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
  • This photograph was published on 30th July 1915 in the Mansfield Reporter and Sutton Times and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Ernest Robinson - This photograph was published on 30th July 1915 in the Mansfield Reporter and Sutton Times and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918