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  • This photo was originally published in the Retford Times following the death of George Whitlam
Person Details
Clarborough, nr Retford, Nottinghamshire
John Whitlam and Annie Hewitt of Retford married in 1881 in the town . They had a son, George Whitlam, born in Clarborough, Retford in 1888 who would die as a soldier in World War one. George had 10 siblings, five brothers and five sisters. All the family during their childhood lived in Clarborough, Retford. Their father, John supported his large family by working as a gardener but sometime after 1901 died, as in 1911 his wife, Annie was described as a charwoman and a widow living at George Inn Yard, Retford. At the time of Georges death she was living at 14 Spital Hill, Retford.
13 Jan 1916
28
2749939 - CWGC Website
10604
Enlisted Retford
Private
1st Bn Lincolnshire Regiment
Service record George Whitlam - George was attested at Retford for general service of 3 years, on 1st September 1914 and joined the Lincolnshire Regiment. His Attest papers show he was 26 years old and born in Clarborough. After what seems a short training period, he was sent to France with the Expeditionary Force on 26 January 1915. George survived for almost a year when in October 1915 he was seriously wounded with gunshot wounds to his left foot. The wound was so bad that on the 23 October he was repatriated back to England where he spent 83 days in the sick and wounded hospital, at Boscombe and eventually died of his wound on 13 January 1916 and his body removed to Retford for burial in his home town. Pte George Whitlam Retford Times 21 Jan 1916 Amidst many manifestations of deep sympathy and respect for one of Retford’s gallant sons, the remains were laid to rest in the cemetery on Monday of Pte George Whitlam, 1st Lincoln Regiment. Deceased was the third son of Mrs Whitlam and the late Mr John Whitlam of 81 Whinney Moor Lane, Thrumpton. The brave lad who was formerly employed by Mr David Benson, West Retford enlisted on August 17th 1914. He was deeply moved by the pictures of the German atrocities which appeared in the papers at the time and remarked that he could not stay at home while things were happening in Belgium. He was at Neave Chapelle Hill 60 and Loos and experienced several narrow escapes. On one occasion his rifle was blown from his hands by a shell and his only means of defence was his knife. In November he received a gunshot wound to the foot and died in Boscombe Hospital last Thursday from the effects of the wound. Pte Whitlam who was 25 years of age was given a full Military funeral. The band of the 2nd 4th East Yorks played Chopin’s Funeral March (There follows details of the service and a list of mourners and concludes with the following text):- Mrs Whitlam has three other sons serving their King and country. One is Pte C Whitlam, 6th Lincolns who was wounded on Aug 9th at Suvla Bay. The eldest brother, Pte Thomas Whitlam of the 2nd York and Lancaster Regiment, had been at the front seven months when he was wounded in the left arm. The youngest brother, Trooper H Whitlam of the Sherwood Rangers Yeomanry contracted an illness at Cairo and was sent home some time ago. He sold an hairdressing business at Askern to enlist. Mrs Whitlam is a widow and much sympathy is felt with her and her patriotic family.
Buried in Retford Cemetery
Remembered on

Photos

  • This photo was originally published in the Retford Times following the death of George Whitlam
    George Whitlam - This photo was originally published in the Retford Times following the death of George Whitlam
  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave of George Whitlam in East Retford Cemetery. Photo courtesy of Peter Gillings
    George Whitlam - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave of George Whitlam in East Retford Cemetery. Photo courtesy of Peter Gillings