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  • Family headstone Nottingham General Cemetery.  Photograph Rachel Farrand
Person Details
Nottingham
He was the son of Samuel and Ann (Annie) Brown who in 1891 were living at 9 Burgass Terrace, Nottingham, with their five children, Arthur (16), Ann/Annie, also known as 'Nancie' (11), Thomas Edwin (9), Emma (7) and Elizabeth (3). The family was still at the same address ten years later in 1901 and Samuel and Ann had five children living with them; Ann (21), Thomas Edwin (19), Emma (17), Elizabeth (13) and George Henry (8). By 1911 Samuel and Ann had moved to 24 Paxton Street, Nottingham, and only three of their children were still at home; Thomas Edwin, Elizabeth and George. It is probable that their eldest daughter, Ann (Nancie) had left home on her marriage to JWG Allen. Samuel declared on the 1911 census that he and his wife had been married for 31 years and had had five children born alive of whom only four were still living. However, a total of six children (Arthur, Annie, Thomas, Elizabeth, Emma and George) had been named on the current and two previous census. Thomas' brother in law (Ann's husband), Private JWG Allen Sherwood Foresters, was killed in action on 8 April 1915, just ten days before Thomas' death.
In 1901 he was a polisher (cycle trade) and in 1911 an iron polisher.
18 Apr 1915
33
489234 - CWGC Website
Enlisted Nottingham.
Private
2nd Bn King's Own Yorkshire Light Infantry
He disembarked in France on 19 January 1915. He was killed in action on Hill 60 and is buried in Railway Dugouts Burial Ground (Transport Farm) (grave ref VlK.26). He qualified for the 1915 Star, British War Medal and Victory Medal.
Family headstone, Nottingham General Cemetery: 'Pte JWG Allen, 7th Sherwood Foresters (RHR), the beloved husband of Nancie Allen, killed in action, April 8th 1915, aged 37 years, interred at Kemmel, Belgium. Also my beloved brother, Pte TE Brown, KOYLI, killed in action at Hill 60, April (-), aged (-).' Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Roll of Honour’, 17 May 1915: ‘Brown. Killed in action on Hill 60, April 18th, Private TE Brown, 2nd KOYLI, dearly loved son of Samuel and Annie Brown, 24, Paxton-street, Gordon-road. Duty nobly done.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post, ‘Roll of Honour’, 17 May 1915: ’Brown. At Hill 60, April 18th, my dearly loved brother, and life-long friend of my late husband, Private J Allen, 26, Leicester-street. Re-united. From his sorrowing sister Nancie.’ (www.britishnewspaperarchive.co.uk) Nottingham Evening Post notice (abridged), 29 May 1915: 'Private TE Brown, KOYLI, 24 Paxton Street, Gordon Road, Nottingham, killed in action at Hill 60, April 18th.' “BROWN. – In loving memory of our dear son, Private Thomas Brown, K.O.Y.L.I., of 24, Paxton-street, killed in action April 18th, 1915; also our dear daughter, Emma, who passed away August 5th, 1904. Shall we all meet at Home in the morning, our blessed Redeemer to see; shall we know and be known by our children; what a meeting indeed it will be. – Father and mother. “BROWN. – To the dear memory of our beloved brother, Private Thomas Brown (Tom), K.O.Y.L.I., of 24, Paxton-street, who died for his country April 18th, 1915. He sleeps like a warrior taking his rest, beneath some foreign skies. Nobly he did his duty. – From brother and sisters, George, Lizzie, Annie.” [2] “BROWN. – In proud and cherished memory of our dear son and brother, Private Tom Brown, K.O.Y.L.I., of 24, Paxton-street, killed in action at Hill 60, April 18th, 1915. He died for England. Also our dear Emma, who died August 5th, 1904. Peace, perfect peace, with loved ones far away; in Jesu's keeping we are safe – and the. Silently mourned; sadly mossed. – Father, mother, brothers, and sisters.” [3] “BROWN. – In loving memory of Tom, K.O.Y.L.I., dearly loved son of Mr. and Mrs. S. Brown, 24, Paxton-street, killed in action at Hill 60, April 18th, 1915. He sleeps with the brave. Also dear Emma, his beloved sister, died August 5th, 1904. Reunited. Memory keeps our loved ones near us. – Father, mother, sisters, and brothers.” [4] His sister, Ann [Nancie], lost her husband ten days previously. “ALLEN. – In proud and cherished memory of my dearly-loved husband, Private James Allen, Robin Hoods, [5] 26, Leicester-street, killed by a sniper April 8th, 1915. Also my dear brother Tom (his life-long friend), killed in action ten days later at Hill 60. Gently they sleep in the grave where they laid them; in their last bivouac, peace amid strife, to fall in again when the Captain who made them shall sound the reveille recalling to life. Mourned unseen. – Wife.” [6] He is buried in Railway Dugouts Burial Ground (Transport Farm). [2] 'Nottingham Evening Post,' 18th April 1916. [3] 'Nottingham Evening Post,' 18th April 1917. [4] 'Nottingham Evening Post,' 18th April 1918. [5] Former self-employed dairyman, Pte. James William George Allen, “D” Company, 1/7th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment (Robin Hood Rifles), was killed in action 8th April 1915. He is buried in Lindenhoek Chalet Military Cemetery. [6] 'Nottingham Evening Post,' 7th April 1917. Above notices are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
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Photos

  • Family headstone Nottingham General Cemetery.  Photograph Rachel Farrand
    TE Brown - Family headstone Nottingham General Cemetery. Photograph Rachel Farrand
  • Photo was published in the Nottingham Evening Post 29th May 1915, courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Thomas Edwin Brown - Photo was published in the Nottingham Evening Post 29th May 1915, courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918