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  • Photo courtesy Jim Grundy  and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Sneinton, Nottingham
George William Knighton was born in 1880 the son of Charles William a stone pavier for the corporation and his wife Ruth (née Hurdis) Knighton. His parents were both born at Nottingham, Charles William in 1859, Ruth in 1862. Married in 1879 at Nottingham, they had the following children - George William b.1880, John b.1883, Charles b.1885, Thomas b.1887 and Harold Robert Henry b.1895. All were born in Sneinton. George William married Lilly Kelly 2/6/1904 whilst they were both living on Kentwood Road, Nottingham – George at number 40, Lilly at 28. In 1911, they lived at 55, Manvers Street, Nottingham. In 1911, George’s parents were living at 1, Colwick Crossings, Nottingham with their son Harold, a points lad on the trams. George William’s effects of £86/19s/10d were left to his widow Lilly (Probate, Nottingham 2/7/1915)
He owned a fish shop.
15 May 1915
35
2750485 - CWGC Website
L/7973
Sergeant
152nd Bde Royal Field Artillery
'A' Bty George William Knighton was a veteran of the Boer War, during which he had served with the Robin Hood Rifles. He re-enlisted at Nottingham and and died of pneumonia. He is buried in Nottingham General Cemetery Grave Reference: 9614 B George’s brother Harold Robert Henry Knighton, a fish salesman by this time, enlisted on 25th October 1915 at Nottingham aged 20. He was posted to the Army Service Corps and reported for duty at their depot at Osterley Park on 30th October 1915. He embarked on SS Viper from Southampton on 1st December 1916 and disembarked at Le Harve the following day. He served throughout the war with 102 Petrol Company Army Service Corps and was eventually demobilised to class ‘Z’ reserves on 26th August 1919 at Woolwich. Another brother Charles Knighton, a brick maker, enlisted at Nottingham on 8th January 1903 aged 18. He was posted to the Royal Artillery and served on the home front until he was posted to India on 5th December 1904. He returned to England on 7th June 1911 where he served until he went to France on 17th September 1914. He served until 9th January 1916 when he was returned to England an discharged on 14th January 1916 having served a total of 13 years and 7 months.
Nottingham Evening Post notices (abridged), 17 May 1915: ‘Knighton. Sergeant George William Knighton RFA, aged 35 years, husband of Lily, 55 (sic) Manvers Street.’ NEP notice (abridged), 17 May 1915 and 18 May 1915: ‘Knighton. Sergeant George William Knighton RFA, aged 35 years, husband of Lily, 50 (sic) Manvers Street. Internment at Waverley Street [Nottingham General Cemetery].’ The funeral of Sgt. George William Knighton, “A” Battery, 152nd Brigade Royal Field Artillery, took place at Nottingham General Cemetery on 19th May 1915. The Boer War veteran, where he had served with the contingent of Robin Hood Rifles, had died of pneumonia on 15th May 1915. Nottingham Evening Post 19th May 1915: 'NOTTM. SOLDIER’S DEATH. PUBLIC SYMPATHY AT THE FUNERAL. A striking demonstration of public sympathy was associated with the funeral, with military honours, of Sergeant George William Knighton, a popular non-commissioned officer in the local R.F.A. unit, which took place at the Nottingham General Cemetery this afternoon [19th May 1915]. Formerly a conductor on the city tramways, he saw service in the South African war with Robin Hoods, for which he possessed a medal with five clasps. He was 35 years old, the cause of his death being pneumonia. The cortege left the house of the deceased in Manvers-street, headed by the Nottingham Salvation Army Band, under Bandmaster W. Vickers, and en route to the cemetery a funeral march was played. Amongst those in attendance were a number of the deceased's old comrades, including Privates E. Ward and J. W. Hunt, who were with him in the Boer campaign, while two batteries of the R.F.A.. under Lieut. Simpson, paraded in line. The coffin was borne by the following N.C.O.’s of the R.F.A.: Sergts. Harrison, Hallam, Turnbull, Healam, James, McClements, and Riddle. After the committal service a firing party from the Robin Hoods, in charge of Coy.-Sgt.-Major Earl, discharged three volleys, and the “Last Post” was sounded by a Robin Hood bugle party, in charge of Bugle-Major Machin.' Article courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918 Research by Peter Gillings
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  • Photo courtesy Jim Grundy  and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Knighton's headstone in Nottingham General Cemetery - Photo courtesy Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918