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  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking the grave of William Freeman at the Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. 
photo courtesy of Peter Gillings
Person Details
Nottingham
William Freeman was the son of Sidney Tomlin Freeman and Ellen Hardy who married at Nottingham in 1894. Their children included: Ellen (b.1895), Ethel (b.1896), William (b.1897) and Sidney (b.1901/d.1901). The family lived at: 3 Marshall Terrace, Briar Street, Meadows [C.1901]; 8 Independent Street Radford [C.1911]; 84 Ilkeston Road, Radford [army pension records/1914]. In 1910 Ellen Freeman married William Thornton Jackson. It is not clear what had happened to her first husband, Sidney, who worked as a bricklayer. Her second husband, William Thornton Jackson, appears to die in the Southwell registration district, aged 69, in 1944. What happened to Ellen is also unclear.
William Freeman worked as a bronzer, working for a lithographic printer (1911), Colliery pony driver (Army Records (1914).
07 May 1918
21
2750273 - CWGC Website
R/7391
84 Ilkeston Road, Radford
Rifleman
Rfn. Freeman enlisted at Nottingham 17 November 1914 (almost certainly lied about his age stating he was 19 years 10 months old); joined the King’s Royal Rifles at Winchester on 20 November 1914; he was posted to the 4th Bn. King’s Royal Rifles on 8 May 1915; suffered gunshot wound to left arm on 16 August 1915 while in action at Armentieres, France; suffered similar head wound on 17 August 1915; sent home 18 September 1915; formally discharged from the Army as no longer physically fit on 8 June 1916; now living at 132 Alfred Street South, Nottingham he was awarded an Army pension on 22 June 1916 (his age was stated to be 21); continued to suffer poor health which prevented him from getting work; died
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth war grave headstone marking the grave of William Freeman at the Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. 
photo courtesy of Peter Gillings
    William Freeman - Commonwealth war grave headstone marking the grave of William Freeman at the Rock Cemetery, Nottingham. photo courtesy of Peter Gillings