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Person Details
Mansfield Nottinghamshire
Thomas Scott was the son of George Scott and his first wife Rose Ann (née Cox). Both his parents were born in Mansfield, his father in 1870 and his mother in 1871. George and Rose Ann were married at Mansfield SS Peter & Paul in December 1890. Rose died in 1895 and George married secondly Ada Ward (b. 1866 Nottingham) in 1904 (reg. Nottingham). According to the information provided by George on the 1911 Census, he and his second wife had been married for seven years and Ada had not had children. However, George had had three children, one of whom had died. Three children were named on the 1901 Census, Lily, Willie and Thomas: Lily (or Lillian) b. Mansfield 1892 bap. Mansfield St Philip April 1892, Willie b. Nottingham abt. 1893 and Thomas b. Mansfield 1893 (reg. Thomas, O/N/D Mansfield) bap. (George Thomas) Mansfield St Philip 1894. No birth registration, baptismal record or death registration have yet been traced for Willie (Scott or Ward). In 1891, the year after their marriage, George, a general labourer, and Rose, a cotton doubler, were living on Newgate Lane, Mansfield. By 1901, George, now working as a bricklayer, was living at 6 Hope Street, Newgate Lane with Ada (34), described as his wife, and children Lily (9) Willie (8) and Thomas (7). George and Ada had moved to 2 Fairholme Drive, Mansfield, by 1911. Also in the home on the night of the census were George's children Thomas, a coal miner, and Lilian, a millhand. George and Ada were still living at the same address in 1939 when the England & Wales Register was compiled. George died in 1944 (reg. J/F/M).
1911 - coal miner
09 May 1915
19
868113 - CWGC Website
14201
Private
2nd Bn Lincolnshire Regiment
2nd Bn Lincolnshire Regiment. Formerly 13457 Leicestershire Regiment. Served as Thomas Scott. Private Thomas Scott was killed in action on 9 May 1915. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Ploegsteert Memorial, Belgium (Panel 3). CWGC - History of Ploegsteert Memorial (extract): 'Most of those commemorated by the memorial did not die in major offensives, such as those which took place around Ypres to the north, or Loos to the south. Most were killed in the course of the day-to-day trench warfare which characterised this part of the line, or in small scale set engagements, usually carried out in support of the major attacks taking place elsewhere. It does not include the names of officers and men of Canadian or Indian regiments (they are found on the Memorials at Ypres, Vimy and Neuve-Chapelle) and those lost at the Battle of Aubers Ridge, 9 May 1915, who were involved in the Southern Pincer (the 1st, 2nd, Meerut and 47th Divisions - they are commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial).' (www.cwgc.org)
WW1 Pension Ledgers Index Cards (Thomas Scott): father George Scott, res. Mansfield. Registers of Soldiers' Effects (Thomas Scott): his legatee was Miss Florence Meade. Note: There is a record of a Florence Meade (12, b. London) who in 1911 was living with her parents, Oliver and Edith, on Portland Street, Mansfield Woodhouse.
Remembered on