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  • This photo was first published in the Retford Times on 6th December 1918 following the death of Herbert Thompson
Person Details
Wiseton, Clayworth
Herbert Thompson was the only son born to Matthew Thompson and his wife Sarah Ann (nee Stephenson) in 1894. The couple had married in Clayworth in 1881 and initially lived with Sarah’s parents in Main Street, Clayworth. During her married life Sarah had 11 children with only six surviving to adulthood. Apart from Herbert, the remaining others were Ethel, first born in 1882, Lily in 1888, Harriet 1895, Betsy 1897 and Nellie born 1899. After the first two daughters were born, they moved to Wiseton, a small village and country estate in Clay worth Parish, Nottinghamshire, where Matthew worked as a farmer. By 1911, Herbert was employed as a domestic gardener. He later moved to Melton Mowbray.
04 Nov 1918
24
274467 - CWGC Website
74950
Lance Bombardier
Royal Garrison Artillery
At the time of his enlistment at Melton Mowbray on 1st February 1916, Herbert was resident at Wicklow Lodge, Melton Mowbray. He passed his medical which noted him as a tall 22 year old man of 6’ 1”. He was put on army reserve until mobilised on 12 April 1916. After his training he was sent to France via Southampton and Harve on the 27th November 1916. Almost two years later on the 1st of November 1918, he was admitted to Hospital in France, sick, and died of influenza which was contracted whilst on active service, on the 4th November. He was buried in the Busigny Communal Cemetery Extension, France.
Bombardier Herbert Thompson Retford Times 6th December 1918 A Wiseton Soldier Since the report of the death of Bombardier Hbt Thompson, in our issue of Nov 22nd some very sympathetic letter have been received by his parents, Mr and Mrs Thompson, New Wiseton, testifying to the capabilities of this young soldier, and to his popularity among his comrades. The following letter is from a Captain in the 73rd Brigade:- " It is with deep regret that I write to express my sympathy with you and your family in the loss of your son. I am medical officer of the brigade, and your son was my sick corporal for the whole of this year, and I had formed a very high opinion of him during the months we have worked so intimately together. We have shared some very exciting times during the hard work of the past, and he was always willing and cheerful to go with me wherever we were required, and I trusted him as my right hand. He was taken ill with influenza, and I sent him to hospital, and was very shocked to hear of his death four days later. Please accept my deepest sympathy. " The Chaplain wrote stating that the officers and men of the brigade desired him to express their deepest sympathy with Mr and Mrs Thompson in the death of their son. We all had a high opinion of him, and he was universally esteemed by the men of the batteries as well as those of the brigade.
Remembered on

Photos

  • This photo was first published in the Retford Times on 6th December 1918 following the death of Herbert Thompson
    Herbert Thompson - This photo was first published in the Retford Times on 6th December 1918 following the death of Herbert Thompson