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  • 11012 Private George Foster, 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) was killed in action on 2nd March 1915, whilst the battalion was holding the front line at La Gorgue, France. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial France. Visited, wreath laid and photo taken by John Morse
Person Details
Hyson Green
George Foster was born in 1890 in Hyson Green and was the son of Lacy a lithographic printer and Elizabeth Foster née Hinxman of 72 Dale Road, Carlton . His father Lacy was born in 1864 in Ilkeston and his mother Elizabeth Hinxman was born in 1865 in Northampton, they were married in 1886 in Nottingham and went on to have 12 children, sadly two of whom died in infancy or early childhood, their surviving children were Lacey b1888 Nottingham, George b1890 Hyson Green, Frances b1892 Hyson Green , Sarah Elizabeth b1894 Carlton , Arthur b1895 Carlton, William b1897 Carlton , Harriett b1902 Carlton, John b1903 Carlton, Mary b1907 Carlton and Hilda b1909 Carlton. In 1901 the family lived on Mount Pleasant Carlton Nottingham. By the 1911 census the family are living at 72 Dale Road, Carlton and are shown as Lacy 47 yrs a lithographic printer, he is living with his wife Elizabeth 46 yrs and their children Lacy 23 yrs a brickyard labourer, Sarah Elizabeth 17 yrs working in the lace industry, Arthur 16 yrs a pony driver at colliery, William 14 yrs a colliery worker, Harriet 9 yrs a scholar, John 8 yrs a scholar, Mary 4 yrs and Hilda 2 yrs. By the 1911 census George has already left home and joined the Army and he was serving in India with the Sherwood Foresters.
1908 - General Labourer 1911 - Regular Soldier
02 Mar 1915
26
859534 - CWGC Website
11012
Carlton Nottingham
Private
1st Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
George Foster, enlisted on 3 November 1908 into the Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment). He was 19 years, 5 months and 5 feet 4 inches in height. After a period of training he was posted to 1st battalion in India on 7 October 1909 and served with 'A' company. In December 1913 he was admitted to hospital with Malaria and after two weeks recovered enough to return to the battalion. On 2 June 1914 he was in hospital with a temperature of 102 degs, which lasted for three days. It was not positive that it was Malaria again and by 19th, he had recovered. He returned to England with the battalion on the outbreak of war. After refitting and reorganization the battalion proceeded to France on 4 November 1914. On 11 December 1914, George was on his way home on the Hospital Ship Carisbrooke Castle, suffering from frostbite. Once treated, he was once again sent to the 1st battalion. The war diary for the 2 March 1915 " Lieut. Williamson reported killed in the early morning whilst crossing a road visiting a detached Platoon, he was shot through the right lung. Both our guns and the enemy's were fairly active during the day. Nice sunny day, but rather cold wind.6 p.m., C.O. and O.C. companies of 2 East Lancs, come down to have a look at the trenches, as they are taking over from battalion on night of 3rd inst. At present B, C, and D lines are held by 24th Infantry Brigade. The Divisional Cavalry and Cyclists have been attached to Brigade, and together with 1/4th Camerons hold C Lines on our right. A lines have now been taken over by the Indian Corps and VIII th Division are holding E and F, Both 23rd and 25th Brigades have been sent back for rest". At some point in the day George was one of two men killed. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial France. John Morse
This was not the last loss to be suffered by the family. One of his sisters, Frances Miriam Pole, had an illegitimate child while her husband, Thomas Pole, was serving with the 9th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment. After being awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal for his bravery during the Third Battle of Ypres, he was granted two weeks' home leave. On the penultimate day of that leave, 12th February 1918, he killed his wife's eleven month-old baby, drowning Evelyn Foster Pole in a dolly tub in the yard of 72 Dale Road. Above is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • 11012 Private George Foster, 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) was killed in action on 2nd March 1915, whilst the battalion was holding the front line at La Gorgue, France. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial France. Visited, wreath laid and photo taken by John Morse
    George Foster Memorial - 11012 Private George Foster, 1st Battalion Sherwood Foresters (Notts and Derby Regiment) was killed in action on 2nd March 1915, whilst the battalion was holding the front line at La Gorgue, France. He has no known grave and is commemorated on the Le Touret Memorial France. Visited, wreath laid and photo taken by John Morse
  • Photograph published on 27th March 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    George Foster - Photograph published on 27th March 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918