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  • Photograph published in the Nottingham Daily Express dated 24th June 1916 and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
Person Details
31 Mar 1885
Cork
Frederick Harte Mortimer was born in 1885 in Cork and was the son of Alfred William a soldier and Caroline Mortimer née Orrin , of The Foresters, Orston Drive, Wollaton Park. His father Alfred William was born in 1857 in Stirling and his mother Caroline Orrin was born in 1861 in Colchester, they were married in 1879 in Colchester and went on to have the following children, Marian Louisa b1857 Stirling, Alexander Galbraith b1883 Portland, Frederick Harte b 31st March 1885 in Cork, Louis Orrin b1889 Colchester, Joseph Edgar b1891 Colchester, Arthur Dore b1894 Normanton, Derbyshire, Raymond Cameron b1896 Normanton, Albert Victor b1898 Normanton, Robert Edward b1901 Normanton, Jack b1901 b Parkhurst Top, Hampshre, and John Alfred b1909 Nottingham. In the 1911 census Frederick is shown as being a Sergeant , 26 yrs, single and is with the 2nd battalion Sherwood Foresters at their barracks at Crowhill, Devon . In the same census his family are living at 82 Noel Street, Nottingham, his father is shown as Alfred 53 yrs an army pensioner, he is living with his wife Caroline 50 yrs and six of their children, Joseph Edgar 19 yrs a hosiery warehouseman, Arthur Dore 17 yrs a railway clerk, Raymond Cameron 14 yrs a grocers errand boy, Albert Victor 12 yrs a scholar, Robert Edward 10 yrs a scholar and Jack 8 yrs a scholar. Frederick married his wife Eliza Casey in Nottingham in 1912 and they lived at 1, Cantab Terrace, Archer St., Nottingham and had a daughter May Marian Louise Mortimer born 11th November 1914. they later lived at 162 Russell Road, Forest Fields, Nottingham. Following his death his widow Eliza was awarded a pension of 19 shillings a week which commenced on 26th February 1917.
In 1911 he is a serving soldier with the Sherwood Foresters
01 Jul 1916
31
1546062 - CWGC Website
9439
Company Sergeant Major
  • DCM DCM Distinguished Conduct Medal
C Coy 1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Company Sergeant Major Frederick Mortimer was a career soldier, he is shown as a Sergeant with the 2nd battalion Sherwood Foresters in the 1911 census. He was awarded a Distinguished Conduct Medal and was serving with C Company 1/7th battalion Sherwood Foresters when he was killed in action on the First day of the Battle of the Somme 1st July 1916, he has no known grave, his name is commemorated on the Thiepval Memorial, The Somme His official citation for his DCM was published in the 'London Gazette' of 21st June 1916: “For gallant and good work when throwing bombs at a critical period. He has shown great daring and resource.”
An article published on 22nd June 1916 in the Nottingham Daily Express :- “ANOTHER ROBIN HOOD HONOURED. “It is gratifying to note in last night’s Honours Supplement to the “London Gazette” of June 3rd last appear the of names of several members of local regiments. The decorations, all Distinguished Conduct Medals, are for acts of gallantry on the field and for distinguished service while on duty. “No fewer than eight members of Notts. contingents have been awarded the medal, whilst five members of Leicester regiments and three members of Lincolnshire regiments have also won the distinction. “Amongst the Notts. names is that of Acting-Company-Sergeant-Major Fred Mortimer, one of the six soldier sons of Sergeant-Major Mortimer, of the Robin Hoods. Sergeant-Major Fred Mortimer is almost as well-known to Nottingham people as his father. “Though he had served with one of the Regular lines of the Notts. and Derbyshire Regiment, he took an active part in the raising of Territorial units and was attached to the Robin Hoods when he performed the gallant act which drew attention to his fine work and secured for him the honour.” Further article published in the Nottingham Daily Express dated 24th June 1916 :- “ROBIN HOOD D.C.M. “Father and Eight Sons Serving in the Army. “Acting Company-Sergeant-Major Frederick Mortimer is the gallant Robin Hood who, as announced in the “Express” on Thursday, [22nd June 1916] has been awarded the Distinguished Conduct Medal. “Sergeant-Major Mortimer is a born soldier, being a member of a Nottingham family which has already won distinction. A son of another well-known Robin Hood, Sergeant-Major Alfred Mortimer, who is at the moment busily engaged training younger “Robins,” he has seven brothers in the Army, and another younger one is pursuing military duties “somewhere in England.” All told, there are ten Mortimers “doing their bit” for King and country. “Soldiering is to the Mortimers,” an old campaigner of the Sherwood Foresters once remarked, on hearing of the family's proud record, “what water is to young ducks.” “Mrs. Mortimer is justly proud of her husband's and sons' patriotism, and possesses a much-prized letter of congratulations from the King. “Sergeant-Major Fred served with one of the Regular battalions of the Notts. and Derbyshire Regiment, and he took an active part in the raising and training of the Territorial units. Above articles are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
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Photos

  • Photograph published in the Nottingham Daily Express dated 24th June 1916 and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
    Frederick Mortimer - Photograph published in the Nottingham Daily Express dated 24th June 1916 and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.