[Skip to content]



  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave at Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, Pas De Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
Person Details
Radford Nottingham
He was the son of John H (died 1903) and Caroline Stableford and the brother of Elizabeth, Harriet and Thomas Stableford. In 1901 they lived at 80 Forster Street Radford and in 1911 at 157 Willoughby Street Lenton (both Nottingham). He was the husband of Martha (née Fitch) Stableford and the father of John H Stableford. They lived at 19 Middleton Street Radford Nottingham.
In 1911 he was a lace trade packer.
29 Jun 1916
23
197086 - CWGC Website
2782
Corporal
1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Albert Stableford enlisted 21/9/1914 as a Territorial and signed the Imperial Service Obligation. He was six feet tall and weighed 152 lbs. He was promoted lance corporal 17/10/1915 and corporal 30/5/1916. He served in Britain until 28/2/1915 when he embarked for France. He is buried in Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, Pas de Calais, France Grave Reference: I F 24
Personal effects returned to his widow were two discs, postcards, photos, two wallets, belt, two pocket books, token of prayer, testament, cigarette case and cards. 6/1/1917 Martha Stableford was awarded a weekly pension of 15/- for herself and one child. Nottingham Evening Post obituary (abridged) 15 July 1916: 'Stableford, killed in action June 29th 1916, Corporal Albert Edward Stableford, 157 Willoughby Street, New Lenton. Mother, sisters, brother.' Army records erroneously cite his name as Albert Ernest Imperial Service Obligation The concept of the Territorial Force was for it to ensure home defence while a large part of the British regular army was deployed to Europe as an Expeditionary Force. On mobilisation in the event of war the units would form a central mobile striking force and coastal defence formations. The TF was mobilised for full-time war service immediately war was declared. This was known as being ‘embodied’. Men enlisting into the TF were not obliged by their terms to serve overseas, although they could agree to do so. When TF troops agreed to overseas service, they signed the ‘Imperial Service Obligation’. When war was declared, all TF troops received orders to mobilise. Some were sent to garrison duties at various points around the Empire, replacing the regular units that were required for service in France. When the Military Service Act was introduced in 1916, all men were deemed to have agreed to overseas service and thus all Second Line became available to be sent overseas. David Nunn
Remembered on

Photos

  • Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave at Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, Pas De Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle
    Albert Edward Stableford - Commonwealth War Graves Commission headstone marking the grave at Foncquevillers Military Cemetery, Pas De Calais, France. Courtesy of Murray Biddle