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Nottingham - Woodborough Road Baptist Church

Memorial listing six officers and fourteen men from the ranks who lost their lives during the Great War. 

The inscription reads:


'ERECTED BY THE CHURCH AND CONGREGATION IN PROUD AND GRATEFUL MEMORY OF THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN DEFENCE OF RIGHT IN THE GREAT WAR.'


An inscription under the names reads:  'DEATH IS SWALLOWED UP IN VICTORY'

Woodborough Road Baptist Church (163, Woodborough Road, Nottingham. NG3 1AX), designed by the eminent Nottingham architect Watson Fothergill, opened in 1895. Around 1980, it was taken over by the Pakistani League of Friends and is now an Islamic Community Centre. The church’s Great War memorials, one listing fatalities, the other members of the congregation who served and returned, were conserved by Rory Newsome. ‘My former history teacher,’ he notes, 'bought them from a salvage company that had cleared out the church and offered them to me last summer. I purchased them to protect their existence.' Mr Newsome hopes these memorials can be 'restored to their local area'.

Memorial location
Names on Memorial

L Adamson - Leonard Adamson

F Atkinson - Fred Atkinson

WH Atkinson - William Henry Atkinson

E Evley - Ernest Evley

Charles Ferguson - Charles Edgar Ferguson

AC Frettingham - Arthur Cyril Frettingham

JW Green - John William Green

E Grocock - Edward Owen Grocock

HH Haynes - Henry Hellas Haynes

E Horner - William Ernest Horner

S Hufton - Samuel Hufton

C Minard - Clarence Victor Minard

A Parnham - Arthur Parnham

F Rowland - Frederick William Rowland

J Rowland - Joseph Rowland

D Scanlon - Herbert Douglas Scanlon

GO Straw - Gilbert Owen Straw

Herbert Wade - Herbert Wade

Sidney Wade - Sidney Wade

Leslie Woodward - Leslie Collins Woodward

Photos
  • Memorial listing six officers and fourteen men from the ranks who lost their lives during the Great War. 

The inscription reads:


'ERECTED BY THE CHURCH AND CONGREGATION IN PROUD AND GRATEFUL MEMORY OF THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN DEFENCE OF RIGHT IN THE GREAT WAR.'


An inscription under the names reads:  'DEATH IS SWALLOWED UP IN VICTORY'
    Photo courtesy of Rory Newsome - Memorial listing six officers and fourteen men from the ranks who lost their lives during the Great War. The inscription reads: 'ERECTED BY THE CHURCH AND CONGREGATION IN PROUD AND GRATEFUL MEMORY OF THOSE WHO GAVE THEIR LIVES IN DEFENCE OF RIGHT IN THE GREAT WAR.' An inscription under the names reads: 'DEATH IS SWALLOWED UP IN VICTORY'
  • Second memorial listing sixteen officers, one hundred and four men from the ranks and one woman VAD (Red Cross nurse) who served during the Great War and survived. The inscription reads: 'IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION OF THOSE WHO SERVED IN THE GREAT WAR'
    Photo courtesy of Rory Newsome - Second memorial listing sixteen officers, one hundred and four men from the ranks and one woman VAD (Red Cross nurse) who served during the Great War and survived. The inscription reads: 'IN GRATEFUL RECOGNITION OF THOSE WHO SERVED IN THE GREAT WAR'
  • Woodborough Road Baptist Church was a fine example of the work of Watson Fothergill (1841-1928) which was influenced by Gothic Revival and Old English vernacular architecture styles. This church includes typical Fothergill design features - the use of contrasting horizontal bands of red and blue brick, dark timber eaves and balconies, and elaborate turrets and stone carving.

According to the Nottingham Evening Post in 1895:

'It is a commanding structure, and an undoubted ornament to the town. It has a nave of seven bays divided from aisles of slightly unequal width by iron columns, which support a semi-circular arcade and clerestory. The end at the junction of Alfred-street is a portion of a many-sided polygon, whilst the other end is a semi-octagon containing the choristry and platform, the pulpit being in the centre, with the organ behind. The choristry has a circular roof. The pulpit of wood is in front of the baptistery. The galleries which run round the sides, and the circular end in Alfred-street provide 284 sittings. There is sitting accommodation in the chapel itself for about 930 persons. The interior, which is rather unconventional in treatment, is attractive, well lighted, and comfortably heated. The ceiling is of plaster, nicely decorated; the walls being of red brick, relieved with blue and buff bricks in bands. Small squares of tinted glass constitute the windows. A striking feature of the exterior is an octagonal tower, 100 feet high at the juncture of the four roads clock faces being placed on either side of the upper part. Red brick, relieved with blue brick bands, is used for the exterior, but the plinth is of rock-faced Derbyshire stone, with terra-cotta bands. A lobby connecting the two principal entrances is situate in Alfred-street, and no less than five new classrooms have been provided in connection with the schools, three of the old class-rooms having been enlarged and improved.' (Wikipedia).
    Photo courtesy of Peter Gillings - Woodborough Road Baptist Church was a fine example of the work of Watson Fothergill (1841-1928) which was influenced by Gothic Revival and Old English vernacular architecture styles. This church includes typical Fothergill design features - the use of contrasting horizontal bands of red and blue brick, dark timber eaves and balconies, and elaborate turrets and stone carving. According to the Nottingham Evening Post in 1895: 'It is a commanding structure, and an undoubted ornament to the town. It has a nave of seven bays divided from aisles of slightly unequal width by iron columns, which support a semi-circular arcade and clerestory. The end at the junction of Alfred-street is a portion of a many-sided polygon, whilst the other end is a semi-octagon containing the choristry and platform, the pulpit being in the centre, with the organ behind. The choristry has a circular roof. The pulpit of wood is in front of the baptistery. The galleries which run round the sides, and the circular end in Alfred-street provide 284 sittings. There is sitting accommodation in the chapel itself for about 930 persons. The interior, which is rather unconventional in treatment, is attractive, well lighted, and comfortably heated. The ceiling is of plaster, nicely decorated; the walls being of red brick, relieved with blue and buff bricks in bands. Small squares of tinted glass constitute the windows. A striking feature of the exterior is an octagonal tower, 100 feet high at the juncture of the four roads clock faces being placed on either side of the upper part. Red brick, relieved with blue brick bands, is used for the exterior, but the plinth is of rock-faced Derbyshire stone, with terra-cotta bands. A lobby connecting the two principal entrances is situate in Alfred-street, and no less than five new classrooms have been provided in connection with the schools, three of the old class-rooms having been enlarged and improved.' (Wikipedia).