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Reed Mills, Sheepbridge Lane, Bleak Hills, Mansfield

Bradbury's caption reads: 'After the end of the war in 1918, the final accounting of the dead could begin. Factories, shops, schools and churches all began the process of recording in stone the names of their men who would never return. This is the unveiling of the plaque at the Reed Mills, Bleak-Hills.'

Mansfield Reporter, 22 August 1922: ‘Reed Mills Memorial Unveiling. Fifty-five men from Reed Mills, Bleak Hills, served in the war and six fell, and a memorial tablet has now been erected in the mill yard by the workpeople. This was unveiled on Wednesday afternoon by Mr F Johnson, the owner of the mill, in the presence of a large assembly, over which Mr S Pickering presided. It was a simple but impressive ceremony. The Rev. H Bromley led the assembly in prayer and pronounced the Benediction, and the ‘Last Post’ and the ‘Reveille’ were sounded by two buglers of the Notts and Derbys. At the close of the ceremony a number of most beautiful wreaths were laid at the foot of the memorial by relatives of the fallen Mr Johnson, in unveiling the memorial, first apologised for the absence of his wife, who was to have performed the ceremony but was unable to do so, being away from home. Proceeding, he said their record of war service was one of which they might be justly proud, and one which no single business in England could surpass. That memorial was a record and a tradition which would be handed down as long as the mills stood – a record of heroism shown in England’s hour of need by the boys who worked there. The peoples of this world never wanted war – they were led into it. The war had led to the overthrow of several Continental governments and so to a greater measure of constitutional government for the people of Europe. Constitutional government meant government by the will of the people, and therefore there need be no war if the will of the people was emphatically opposed to war.’ Mansfield Reporter, 25 August 1922: ‘Reed Mills War Memorial. ‘The names on the Reed Mills War Memorial tablet, the unveiling of which was reported in last week’s issue, are as follows:- ‘In memoriam. Ben Marsh, Walter Corah, Harold Gadd, Alfred Betts, Charles Hibbert and Clarence Belshaw. Reed Mills were demolished in 1971.

Memorial location
Names on Memorial

Clarence Belshaw - Clarence George Belshaw

Alfred Betts - Alfred Betts

Walter Corah - Walter Corah

Harold Gadd - Harold Gadd

Charles Hibbert - Charles Hibbert

Ben Marsh - Ben Marsh

Photos
  • Bradbury's caption reads: 'After the end of the war in 1918, the final accounting of the dead could begin. Factories, shops, schools and churches all began the process of recording in stone the names of their men who would never return. This is the unveiling of the plaque at the Reed Mills, Bleak-Hills.'
    Courtesy of David J Bradbury, Mansfield: A Pictorial History, (Cambridge, 2005) - Bradbury's caption reads: 'After the end of the war in 1918, the final accounting of the dead could begin. Factories, shops, schools and churches all began the process of recording in stone the names of their men who would never return. This is the unveiling of the plaque at the Reed Mills, Bleak-Hills.'
  • Courtesy of David J Bradbury, Mansfield: A Pictorial History, (Cambridge, 2005) -