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  • The East window of the memorial chapel at St Helen's church Stapleford is dedicated to William Domleo. It has three lights and tracery by Alexander Gascoyne. Gascoyne was born in Nottingham in 1877 and attended the Nottingham School of Art. In the middle light, a haloed Saint George (chosen no doubt for George Domleo) in armour and bearing a shield and a banner spear which is killing the blue and green dragon of evil at his feet. The face here is possibly taken from a photograph of CSM Domleo.
In the left light is St Oswald KM (King and Martyr) with a sceptre and pastoral staff and in the right hand light, St Edward KC (King and Confessor) under a blue halo and with a crown sceptre and clasped book. Oswald was the saintly king of Northumbria who re-introduced Christianity to Northumbria and who died in AD642. Edward the Confessor was king of England from 1042-1066. He grew up with deeply religious views and gained the nickname “Confessor”. All these figures stand against red and blue diapered and ornamented and tasselled drapes. The quarries show a grisaille design with the initials WO for the dedicatee. In the tracery, in stylised floral design is the badge of The Robin Hood's Regiment and the shields with IHS and XP. The window dates from 1918.
The inscription at the bottom of the windows reads:
To the Glory of God and in memory of C.S.M. William George Domleo
Croix-de-Guerre 1/7 Robin Hood Rifles 1914-1918 Killed in action April 1918.
Person Details
15 Sep 1883
Normanton on Soar Leicestershire
He was the son of Tom and Alice Domleo of 2 Brookhill Avenue Stapleford Nottinghamshire.
He is listed on the 1911 Census as a professional footballer lodging in Bury Lancashire. He is also on a war memorial in Wilmslow Cheshire, as an employee of the Refuge Assurance Company Limited.
13 Apr 1918
34
450274 - CWGC Website
265417
Company Sergeant Major
  • Croix de Guerre Croix de Guerre Croix de guerre
1/7th Bn Sherwood Foresters (Notts & Derby Regiment)
Company Sergeant Major William George Domleo enlisted in Nottingham and served with the 1/7th battalion Sherwood Foresters (Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire ) Regiment , he landed in France on 25th February 1915 . The Regimental History states that Domleo was killed by heavy shelling ‘we were cruelly handled by the heavy howitzer fire” at the railway close to Neuve Eglise. He is also described as ‘a splendid warrant officer whose loss was severely felt in ‘D’ Company’. He was buried in Wulvergham Lindenhoek Road, Military Cemetery grave reference V A 22
Lance Sergeant William George Domleo, 1/7th Battalion Nottinghamshire & Derbyshire Regiment (Robin Hood Rifles), wrote of his first experiences of trench warfare in a letter published on 19th April 1915 in the Nottingham Evening Post : “OUR SPLENDID TROOPS. “WHAT THEY THINK OF WAGE SQUABBLES. “Mr. Tom Domleo, of Stapleford, has received a letter from his son, Lance-Sergt. W. G. Domleo, Sherwood Foresters, of which the following are the most interesting passages: "We into the trenches in the dark, about 120 yards from the Germans, and shoot at each other night and day. What an experience! Our trenches are fairly good and practically fireproof. If careful, and we take no risk, a man is unfortunate to get injured, except of course from shell tire. A portion of our trench was blown away shrapnel one afternoon, and we built it up with sandbags under heavy fire, but no one was hit, except one man's arm badly injured by a shell. The most exciting part is entering and leaving the trenches, but risk out here has to taken. "We were wet through to the skin before taking up our position and never got dry all the week and absolutely covered in mud. I have always felt very sympathetic for the brave men who have been fighting through the winter, but take it from me, with my little experience, they were absolute heroes. It seems more than frail human beings can possibly stand, but soldiers do it quite cheerfully. The Tommies are just marvels of optimism and nonchalance in their natural and splendid way of meeting and surmounting all difficulties. You would not believe it unless you had personal experience. They just make the best of everything. It is impossible to thoroughly realise the perils and trials of it, and all we go through; no change of wet clothes, for days and nights on duty without restful sleep, and absolutely covered with mud. But never mind, our cause is a just one, and we shall come out on top in the end. “What we out here absolutely failed understand the industrial strikes in the preparation of munitions of war. Every man who objects to doing his little bit for his own country, irrespective of what it may cost him or what his wages may be, is a traitor. Take it from me, this fight onward to drive the Germans back is a continual uphill fight. The enemy have chosen positions most suitable to themselves and everything possible to retard our advance, and then to think our brothers at home for a mere pittance of ½d. to 3d. an hour going on strike, when we absolutely want more and more of everything and must have it to make headway. We seem get our stores in daily supplies, and should anything happen to prevent them coming in, it means a 24 hours’ fast for the boys who are fighting to protect Old England and her comfortable homes." In memoriam published 12th April 1919 in the Nottingham Evening Post :- “DOMLEO. – C.S.M. Domleo, Croix de Guerre, of Stapleford, killed April 13th, 1918. Gentle and full of understanding, his patience was great, his courage profound; devoted to sport, and in love with life, and he lifted us all to his holy ground. – Mag and Con. “DOMLEO. – In affectionate remembrance of William George Domleo, Company-Sergeant-Major, 1/7th Robin Hoods, killed in action near Kemmel Hill April 13th, 1918. Cherished memories.” above article and in memoriam are courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
Remembered on

Photos

  • The East window of the memorial chapel at St Helen's church Stapleford is dedicated to William Domleo. It has three lights and tracery by Alexander Gascoyne. Gascoyne was born in Nottingham in 1877 and attended the Nottingham School of Art. In the middle light, a haloed Saint George (chosen no doubt for George Domleo) in armour and bearing a shield and a banner spear which is killing the blue and green dragon of evil at his feet. The face here is possibly taken from a photograph of CSM Domleo.
In the left light is St Oswald KM (King and Martyr) with a sceptre and pastoral staff and in the right hand light, St Edward KC (King and Confessor) under a blue halo and with a crown sceptre and clasped book. Oswald was the saintly king of Northumbria who re-introduced Christianity to Northumbria and who died in AD642. Edward the Confessor was king of England from 1042-1066. He grew up with deeply religious views and gained the nickname “Confessor”. All these figures stand against red and blue diapered and ornamented and tasselled drapes. The quarries show a grisaille design with the initials WO for the dedicatee. In the tracery, in stylised floral design is the badge of The Robin Hood's Regiment and the shields with IHS and XP. The window dates from 1918.
The inscription at the bottom of the windows reads:
To the Glory of God and in memory of C.S.M. William George Domleo
Croix-de-Guerre 1/7 Robin Hood Rifles 1914-1918 Killed in action April 1918.
    - The East window of the memorial chapel at St Helen's church Stapleford is dedicated to William Domleo. It has three lights and tracery by Alexander Gascoyne. Gascoyne was born in Nottingham in 1877 and attended the Nottingham School of Art. In the middle light, a haloed Saint George (chosen no doubt for George Domleo) in armour and bearing a shield and a banner spear which is killing the blue and green dragon of evil at his feet. The face here is possibly taken from a photograph of CSM Domleo. In the left light is St Oswald KM (King and Martyr) with a sceptre and pastoral staff and in the right hand light, St Edward KC (King and Confessor) under a blue halo and with a crown sceptre and clasped book. Oswald was the saintly king of Northumbria who re-introduced Christianity to Northumbria and who died in AD642. Edward the Confessor was king of England from 1042-1066. He grew up with deeply religious views and gained the nickname “Confessor”. All these figures stand against red and blue diapered and ornamented and tasselled drapes. The quarries show a grisaille design with the initials WO for the dedicatee. In the tracery, in stylised floral design is the badge of The Robin Hood's Regiment and the shields with IHS and XP. The window dates from 1918. The inscription at the bottom of the windows reads: To the Glory of God and in memory of C.S.M. William George Domleo Croix-de-Guerre 1/7 Robin Hood Rifles 1914-1918 Killed in action April 1918.
  • The family grave of the Domleo family at Staplford cemetery, commemorating William George Domleo.
Courtesy of Peter Gillings
    William George Domleo - The family grave of the Domleo family at Staplford cemetery, commemorating William George Domleo. Courtesy of Peter Gillings
  • The commonwealth wargraves commission headstone marking his grave at Wulvergham , Lindenhoek Road, Military Cemetery courtesy of 'Pearlady' (RIP) findagrave.com
    William George Domleo - The commonwealth wargraves commission headstone marking his grave at Wulvergham , Lindenhoek Road, Military Cemetery courtesy of 'Pearlady' (RIP) findagrave.com