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Person Details
Worksop, Notts
William Starkey was born in Worksop on 21 March 1894 to George Henry and Emily Starkey (nee Richardson). He had an elder sister, Rhoda, born in 1893. These were the only children born to them as by 1896 Emily had died. Four years later in 1901, Rhoda was living with her maternal grandparents in Worksop. Widower George and his son William were living at 6 Duke Place, Worksop, in the house of George’s sister Rose and her husband George Hancock. There was also a visitor, Agnes Walker. George Starkey and Agnes had a very short courtship and married at Barnsley by the end of the year. In 1911, George, Agnes and son William, were lining in 12 Market Street, Cudworth, Yorks. Both George and William were working as coal miners. The family must have moved to Cudworth by at least 1907 as that was the year that George and Agnes had their first child, Arthur, followed by Evilina in 1910. George died in 1912 age 39 at Barnsley. William Starkey emigrated to Canada after this, where, when the war commenced, he enlisted in the Canadian forces, his sister being recorded as his next of kin.
04 Oct 1915
21
444516 - CWGC Website
59908
Private
Canadian Forces
Pte. William Starkey Worksop Guardian 8 October 1915 News has reached Worksop that still another local soldier who has died on the blood drenched fields of fair France. It is Pte. William Starkey 59908, nephew of Mrs Dolby (wife of Mr T E Dolby, a Manton miner), residing at 101 Westgate, Worksop. Pte Starkey who was killed on Monday, was born in Worksop, but emigrated to Canada, enlisted on the outbreak of the war, joining the Canadian contingent, came to England to finish his training, and had only been in France three weeks. His only sister resides with Mr and Mrs Dolby. Poor Starkey, who was well known and respected in the town, was shot by a sniper and died instantly. Lieut-Colonel W S Hughes writing to Miss Starkey under date of October 4th says:- “ It is with feeling of the deepest sympathy and regret that I have to inform you of the death of your brother, Pte. William Starkey. He was shot this morning at 10 o’clock by a German sniper and dying instantly. He was a good boy and a splendid soldier. I am very sorry to have to write this sad news … His body will be buried at 5 o’clock this afternoon, our Chaplain officiating. He will rest in a very nice little burying ground along with many other brave British lads. You have my deepest sympathy.” The greatest sympathy of their many friends will be extended to the relatives of this gallant soldier, who died a noble death. Pte. William Starkey Worksop Guardian 15 October 1915 We reproduce this week a photograph of Pte. William Starkey 59908 nephew of Mrs Dolby wife of Mr T E Dolby, a Manton miner, who was announced in the “Worksop Guardian” last week, has been killed in action. He was born in Worksop, but emigrated to Canada, enlisted on the outbreak of the war, joining the Canadian contingent, came to England to finish his training, and had only been in France three weeks when he was shot by a sniper and died instantly. His only sister resides with Mr and Mrs Dolby. Last week we reproduced a letter from Lieut-Col. W S Hughes who described poor Starkey as a good boy and a splendid soldier. Lieut. G S Bowerbank, writing to Miss Rhoda Starkey, (the sister of the deceased who lives at 101 Westgate) from ‘The Trenches’ says:- “ It is with deepest regret that I have to inform you that your brother, William Starkey, was killed in action on the morning of the 4th inst. His death was instantaneous, and as his Platoon Commander – having been in closest touch with him for the past ten months – I can speak in the highest terms in the manner in which he performed his duties as a soldier, and his never failing cheerfulness. Myself – as all the Platoon – deeply regret his loss. It may comfort you to know that he was buried behind the firing line with the usual burying rites, attended by three of his especial chums. The letter you sent was never received by him, and if I had known your address, I would have notified you sooner. Anything further in my power, I shall only be too pleased to do. I might add that of the 50 odd men under my command, I always looked upon your brother with special regard, with the knowledge that he would carry out implicitly and cheerfully, any duty asked of him. We are not at present allowed to divulge any names of towns, but I will notify you as soon as possible the exact name of the place in Belgium, where your brother is buried. Any personal effects of his will be forwarded to you as soon as possible. “ News has now been received that Private G H Starkey of the 2nd Battalion of the Lincolnshire Regiment, of Hathwaite, has been killed. He is the nephew of Mr G Starkey of Creswell Street, and is also related to Mrs Betteridge of 54 Creswell Street, Worksop, and worked at the Manton Colliery
Buried at St Quentin Cabaret Military Cemetery, Belgium. Research by Colin Dannatt
Remembered on