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  • Photograph published on 15th June 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
Person Details
Worlaby Lincolshire
He was the son of Alfred and Annie Lizzie Cash and the brother of Almira Lizzie and Lucy Cash of 60 Occupation Road Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire.
In 1911 he was a colliery ropeman.
31 May 1916
20
2876086 - CWGC Website
K/22657
Stoker 1st Class
HMS Idefatigable Royal Navy
He was born A/M/J/1896 so may have been 19 when killed. Article published on 15th June 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch :- “The above photograph outlines the feature of another Hucknall lad who sacrificed his life in the North Sea battle on May 31st, namely John Lewis Cash, who was a first class stoker on the Indefatigable. He was 20 years of age and the son of Mr. and Mrs. A. Cash, of Occupation road, Hazel Grove. “It was on June 8th, 1914, when he decided to enter the Royal Navy, and after about five months' training he was rated on the Indefatigable. Previously he was employed at Newstead Colliery. “In a letter to his sister (Lizzie), dated May 29th, and received on the morning of the great engagement, he reported that he was in the best of health and spirits. “The deceased was a bright and promising youth, and his loss is keenly felt by his parents and the family, who are grateful to all friends for their expressions of sympathy in their bereavement.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918 HMS Indefatigable was a battle cruiser sunk at Jutland on May 31st 1916 during the ‘Run to the South’ as Admiral Beatty changed course to steer east south east. Around 16.00hrs Indefatigable was hit around the rear turret by two or three shells from Von der Tann. She fell out of formation to starboard and started sinking towards the stern and listing to port. Her magazines exploded at 4:03 after more hits, one on the forecastle and another on the forward turret. Smoke and flames gushed from the forward part of the ship and large pieces were thrown 200 feet (61.0 m) into the air. The most likely cause of her loss was a deflagration or low-order explosion in 'X' magazine that blew out her bottom and severed the steering control shafts, followed by the explosion of her forward magazines from the second volley. Von der Tann fired only fifty-two 28 cm (11 in) shells at Indefatigable before she exploded. Of her crew of 1,019, only two survived. While still in the water, two survivors found Indefatigable's captain, C. F. Sowerby, who was badly wounded and died before they could be rescued. The two survivors, Able Seaman Elliott and Leading Signalman Falmer, were rescued by the German torpedo boat S16. (Wikipedia)
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph published on 15th June 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.
    John Lewis Cash - Photograph published on 15th June 1916 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918.