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  • Photograph was published on 8th November 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Person Details
Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire
He was the son of William Henry and Ada Annie Pascall and the brother of Ethel Annie Pascall. In 1911 they lived at 126 Watnall Road Hucknall Torkard Nottinghamshire. He left £149 17s 8d to his father a pawnbroker's manager.
He was a furniture shop assistant
12 May 1917
24
1603371 - CWGC Website
24816
Sergeant
10th Bn Lancashire Fusiliers
Sergeant Wilfred William Pascall, served with the 10th Battalion King’s Royal Rifle Corps, he was killed in action on 12th May 1917. He is commemorated on the Arras Memorial.
An article published 8th November 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch reads :- "Into the Jaws of Death. "After nearly six months of mental anguish concerning their son, Wilfred, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Pascall of Watnall road, Hucknall, received news on Wednesday [7th November 1917] confirming that his body was found some weeks ago in front of a German trench. “Thus a noble life has to be included in the list of Hucknall’s fallen soldiers but it would be hard to conceive anything much more heroic. When he was first reported missing, it was stated by Corporal Green, his friend of Sheffield, that he went up to the German trench with other men, and engaged with the enemy. Thus he went into the jaws of death to the verge of the German trenches, and here he nobly fell, as he nobly lived. “Those who knew Sergt. Wilfred Pascall recognised in him an excellent townsman, the only son of Mr. & Mrs. Pascall, and held a good position when war was declared. He could not rest while older men were joining the colours, and in the second month of the war he donned khaki, enlisting in the King’s Royal Rifles. The training he had received in the Boys’ Brigade stood him in good stead, and it was not long ‘ere he was marked out for promotion, which terminated with him being honoured with sergeant’s stripes. He could have risen from the ranks to a lieutenancy, but he preferred to remain in the ranks. That his services were regarded of some value is shown by the fact that he was retained in this country for a considerable time in this country to drill recruits. “When the news came that he was missing, the hope was generally expressed that it would turn out that he was a prisoner in the hands of the Germans, and for some time this, the only hope, was clung to tenaciously. As the weeks passed, however, that hope began to vanish, and now the sad news has to be told that he is one of the warriors who will never return. Much sympathy is extended to Mr. and Mrs. and Miss Pascall in the great blow which has now fallen upon them.” Above article is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
Remembered on

Photos

  • Photograph was published on 8th November 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918
    Wilfred William Pascall - Photograph was published on 8th November 1917 in the Hucknall Dispatch and is courtesy of Jim Grundy and his facebook pages Small Town Great War Hucknall 1914-1918